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Restoration Experts of North Carolina

The Best Water Remediation in Apex, NC

For most homeowners, the thought of dealing with water damage is about as attractive as going to the dentist for a root canal, if not worse. If the recent destruction caused by Hurricane Ida taught us anything, it’s that water damage can be catastrophic. The source of water damage can come from many different sources, including natural causes like rainstorms and internal property issues like pipe bursts. From plumbing problems to full-on floods, water damage in Apex, NC, can weaken your home’s structure and even cause your family to fall ill. That’s why it is so important that you address water damage in your home as soon as possible.

At Restoration Experts of North Carolina, we understand that dealing with water damage can seem like a losing effort. With our team by your side, however, you don’t have to lose hope. We provide comprehensive water remediation in Apex, from initial documentation of your damage to the time that we mitigate your problem. With a team of IICRC certified technicians and high-tech inspection tools, we have the experience and the innovation to restore your home or business to its original beauty.

The Best Water Remediation
Service Areas

With years of experience in the water damage restoration industry, there is no project too small or complex for our team to handle. Our customers are our top priority, and there are no exceptions to that rule.

At the end of the day, our clients choose Restoration Experts of North Carolina for three reasons:

Trustworthy Water Damage Mitigation Services

Trustworthy Water Damage Mitigation Services

Our goal is to restore your losses using mitigation techniques whenever possible to help restore your property to its original condition. If reconstruction is required, we will handle every aspect of your loss through a single, dependable point of contact.

Transparent Restoration with NoHidden Fees

Transparent Restoration with NoHidden Fees

At Restoration Experts of North Carolina, we make it a priority to provide our customers with comprehensive documentation and step-by-step status updates. Our transparent business model makes it easy for our customers to understand our water remediation progress. That way, you know exactly where we’re at with your project and have a permanent record of your home or businesses’ restoration. You won’t ever have to worry about hidden fees, unauthorized charges, or annoying efforts to sell you additional products or services.

Re-Defining Full-Service Water Clean-Up in Apex

Re-Defining Full-Service Water Clean-Up in Apex

Our goal is to be your one-stop source for water remediation in North Carolina. To help achieve this goal, we offer a wide range of additional services on top of our already stellar water damage restoration services. We combine our unmatched expertise with strategic partnerships to better serve our customers. We can provide all you need, from interior design consultations and decorating services to replacement furniture and appliances for your home or business. We are committed to giving our customers informative, effective, streamlined water remediation services in Apex.

Common Signs of Water Damage in Apex, NC

Water damage can happen to any structure, from large storefronts in town to suburban homes outside of the city. Incidents that cause water damage can happen at any time, making them particularly hard to remediate for non-professionals. To make matters worse, spotting signs of water damage isn’t as easy as you might think. Some signs are obvious, while others are subtle and even hidden. However, one of the best ways to address water damage in your home or business is to keep a sharp eye out for the following signs, so that you can treat the problem quickly and get back to normal life.

Signs of Water Damage Outside

Looking for signs outside is a great place to start, as it can narrow down external sources of water leaks. Keep an eye out for the following signs outside:

  • Windows and Door Frames: Check to see if there is any separation between your windows and door frames. Even small separations can lead to moisture leaking into your home or business, leading to mold growth.
  • Cracked or Missing Shingles: Severe rainstorms, tornadoes, and hurricanes are notorious for causing extensive water damage. Powerful natural disasters often strip residential and commercial roofs of shingles and flashing. When this happens, water can leak in through your roof and cause a litany of issues.
  • Ground Slope: Double check that your structure is sitting on the highest point on your property, with the ground sloping away from your home or business. If the ground slopes towards your home, you may be looking at water accumulation problems. When this happens, your foundation is at risk because water will accumulate on the sides of your structure. Eventually, this water can find its way inside.
Signs of Water Damage Inside

After you’re done checking for signs of water damage outside, it’s time to move indoors. Obviously, if you spot any of the following signs, your family could be at risk. It’s important to call Restoration Experts of North Carolina to schedule an inspection to determine the extent of your damage.

  • Sagging Spots on Floor: Sagging occurs around showers, sinks, and bathtubs. Also, check around appliances like dishwashers, water heaters, and washing machines.
  • Water Rings: Look for water rings on your ceilings and walls, as they can be signs of leaky pipes. It’s a good idea to check for water rings regularly, even if you don’t suspect any water damage.
  • Warped Tiles: Water damage to wood and laminate flooring will cause it to warp, bend, and split. Be sure to go out of your way to inspect areas that you might not think of checking, like corners of rooms you don’t go in often.
  • Musty Smell: If you suspect water damage is occurring, trust your sense of smell. If odors of must or mildew are present, you likely have water damage in some form.
  • Rust: Examine your water heater for signs of rust, which can indicate a current or past leak.
  • Watermarks: Check inside and under your cabinets, especially in your bathrooms and kitchen areas. If you see signs of discoloration and warping, you could have water damage in your home or business due to a leaking pipe.

Risks of Water Damage in Apex, NC

If your home or business was recently flooded or you have had recent water damage, it is crucial to dry out your home or place of work ASAP. There are many risks associated with floods and leaks. One of the most common risks in situations like these is when water becomes contaminated. Contamination can happen when a sewer pipe bursts or a body of water floods into your home, like from a river or creek. Contaminated water often contains bacteria and microorganisms that can result in serious conditions like giardia. Even clean water can be a risk when stands for too long, since mosquitoes and other bugs breed in such conditions. Bugs that die in the water and critters that hatch eggs spread bacteria and attract even more bugs to the area.

After water recedes, the dampness left behind can cause fungus and mold growth – both of which can be detrimental to your health, especially if you have respiratory issues like asthma or have allergies.

Whether you have a small damp spot in your basement or severe flooding from a storm, do not take water damage lightly. Waiting to fix the issue will have a huge impact on your wallet, and more importantly, your family’s health.

Restoration Experts of North Carolina utilize the latest high-tech inspection tools like thermal imaging to discover the extent of your water damage. Using pumps, we extract the water and then use high-powered fans and heaters until your business or home is dry. While we’re drying your property, our team monitors and documents the entire process. We also specifically address any health hazards that can be associated with more severe categories of water damage.

If your property has flooded, you could be at risk from the following kinds of water leaks:
Clean Water
Clean Water

this water comes from broken or frozen pipes, failed water heaters, roof leaks, ice maker hoses, and more.

Grey Water
Grey Water

grey water is contaminated due to soiling like body oils, laundry soils, food stains, etc. This type of water often originates from dishwashers, washing machines, tub overflows, and hot tubs.

Black Water
Black Water

this type of water contains thousands of bacteria, protozoa, and disease-causing viruses. Black water most often comes from septic back-ups and overflows, sewer leaks, and toilet overflows.

What to Do When You Have Water Damage in Apex, NC

When your property floods, the first step you should take is to call a qualified contractor to help facilitate your water clean-up in Apex, NC. Restoration Experts of North Carolina has restored countless water losses and knows what needs to be done to get your home or business back to pre-loss condition. In situations like these, you must act fast to prevent damages and illnesses. Also, many home insurance policies require the homeowner to do everything in their power to protect the property from further damage. That’s where Restoration Experts of North Carolina comes in. We’ll bill your insurance company directly and will handle all the necessary water remediation work, so that you can focus on your family and your day-to-day responsibilities. Our team is on-call 24-hours a day and will be on our way to your home or business fast.

Since it'll take us a few minutes to arrive, consider the following pointers to help minimize property damage and speed up the restoration of your home:

  • If water has come from a contaminated source like your toilet, avoid all contact with the water.
  • If you do come into contact, clean yourself as soon as possible.
  • If safely accessible, turn off the source of water.
  • Turn off all power to the affected areas if circuit breakers are safe to access.
  • Remove we books, newspapers, rugs, and other such items. They will stain your home.
  • Blot pooling water with a mop or towels.
  • Remove water-sensitive items from wet areas. Prop them up in a dry, safe place.
  • Prevent additional damage to your furniture by placing plywood or foil underneath the legs.
  • Hang curtains and drapes that are wet in a dry room.
  • Avoid using fans or any electrical devices when standing on wet flooring.
  • Wait for professionals to dry your home or business. Do not use a standard vacuum cleaner, as water can damage these devices.
Steps to Take if You Have Sewage

Steps to Take if You Have Sewage or Black Water Damage

First things first – call Restoration Experts of North Carolina ASAP if you know for a fact that you have a black water leak. Black water contains disease-causing viruses and a plethora of bacteria that can be harmful to you or your children. If a sewage line leaks or your toilet overflows significantly, use our 24-hour emergency line, and our team will come to your location quickly. Until we arrive, take these steps to minimize black water damage in Apex, NC.

  • Stay far away from areas affected by black water.
  • Plug all of your toilets with a string mop or wadded rags if you have had an overflow event.
  • Turn off your HVAC system. Cover exposed vents to prevent water from infiltrating your air ducts.
  • If the source of black water is coming from outside, be sure to turn off all water connections at their entry points.

Restoration Experts of North Carolina is Here for You

Whether your home was flooded from a hailstorm or you have an overflowing dishwasher, we are here to help. Our primary goal is to provide your family or customers with the most effective water remediation in Apex, NC. That way, you can rest easy knowing you have a team of professionals on your side who are qualified and capable of full-serve water clean-up. Remember, if your home is affected by water damage, time is of the essence.

We’re only a call away from keeping your home or business dry and safe.
Contact us

Latest News in Apex

Conservative activists upset after NC principal won’t exempt kindergartner from mask rule

A Raleigh principal’s denial of a kindergarten student’s face mask exemption, despite the child having a doctor’s note, is drawing outrage from some conservative activists.The child’s mother had requested a medical mask exemption from Powell Elementary School, a magnet school in East Raleigh. The parent cited a pediatrician saying that the kindergartner was unable to keep a face mask on because of sensory processing disorder.In a taped telephone conversation that was provided to a local conservative podc...

A Raleigh principal’s denial of a kindergarten student’s face mask exemption, despite the child having a doctor’s note, is drawing outrage from some conservative activists.

The child’s mother had requested a medical mask exemption from Powell Elementary School, a magnet school in East Raleigh. The parent cited a pediatrician saying that the kindergartner was unable to keep a face mask on because of sensory processing disorder.

In a taped telephone conversation that was provided to a local conservative podcaster, principal Curtis Brower told the mother that he needed to see the child’s medical records and speak with the pediatrician. He ultimately rejected the request to let the child not wear a mask all day at school.

“I have the power to make a decision whether this is approved or denied in my school, yes ma’am,” Brower said in the phone call. “The doctor can give me whatever information. If I don’t feel like it would suffice, I deny it. It is my choice, unfortunately. It is the principal’s discretion and decision.”

The telephone call, which occurred in September, was provided by an anonymous parent to Matthew “Jax” Myers and played on his podcast on Tuesday. Myers made headlines in April 2020 when he was arrested after reopening his Apex tattoo parlor in violation of North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper’s stay-at-home order, The News & Observer previously reported.

Myers said on the podcast that the child is now attending Powell masked. But Myers said the child is having anxiety issues from the mask so she can only attend half days of school.

“We’re allowing the left to sacrifice this child on the altar of political correctness,” Myers said on the podcast. “That’s exactly what’s happening.”

Although the parent provided Myers with the recording, Wake County school officials said she has not yet given the school permission to share specifics about the case. Details about students are normally covered by federal privacy laws.

But Lisa Luten, a Wake school spokeswoman, said in a statement Thursday that “the district has reviewed the circumstances described in the recording and, at this time, believes that the school’s actions are consistent with district policies and practices.”

Luten also said that Brower was unaware that the parent had been recording their conversation. North Carolina law only requires one party in a conversation to give consent for it to be recorded.

The issue of wearing face masks has become a heated national topic, leading to protests at school board meetings across the nation. Face masks have become a common sight in schools since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, with some parents arguing it should be a choice whether they’re worn.

Like most of North Carolina’s school districts, Wake County requires face coverings to be worn inside schools. Wake is the state’s largest school district, with 160,000 students.

“Studies have shown that universal masking helps keep secondary transmission rates low within schools,” Luten said in the statement. “In fact, in the last three weeks, WCPSS schools have no reports of secondary transmission of COVID-19 on school campuses.

“The bottom line: Masks are a key tool in keeping everyone in our school communities safe and our own data support that assertion.”

But Wake says it exempts students “if they have a medical condition or disability that renders mask-wearing harmful or medically inadvisable.”

Last school year, Luten said, Wake principals approved more than 200 requests for mask accommodations. The accommodations range from providing students with mask breaks to granting exceptions for students who are unable to wear a mask for the entire school day or parts of the school day.

This school year, Wake didn’t make parents of special-education students attending regional programs file a mask accommodation form. Some of those students don’t wear masks because of their severe disabilities. Wake provides air purifiers in those classrooms.

Some parents have complained about Wake being strict about rejecting mask exemption requests. Some Wake parents have gone on social media asking for names of conservative doctors who’d fill out paperwork supporting their child’s exemption request.

In the Powell case, the parent cited letters from a pediatrician and a chiropractor who said wearing a mask would cause anxiety and agitation that would disrupt the child’s ability to learn. Brower said he needed more information on the case, citing how sensory processing issues can present differently for individual students.

Sensory processing disorder is a condition in which the brain has trouble receiving and responding to information that comes in through the senses, according to WebMD.

Brower told the parent that her daughter would have to wear a mask unless the accommodation request was approved. Brower said they could take steps such as providing her additional mask breaks and having her sit more than 6 feet apart from other students.

“Because she’s not been wearing a mask and she’s new to kindergarten and she’s got sensory processing disorder, we’re willing to work with you to desensitize her concern and her needs with wearing a face covering,” Brower told the parent. “So in order to determine what this desensitization process is gonna look like, we just need more information from the physician.”

The request for medical records has drawn complaints from Myers and some other conservative activists. Luten said it’s common for principals to ask for student medical records when health accommodations are requested, such as for peanut allergies.

“We need this principal to be gone,” Myers said. “We need an example to be set and we need to find out if other principals are also doing this.”

Clayton Dillard, a frequent speaker at Wake school board meetings against the mask mandate, said on Myers’ podcast that Brower “should be in jail” and “should be prosecuted.”

This story was originally published October 22, 2021 10:55 AM.

Shop local at Raleigh, Apex night markets

Raleigh, N.C. — What is one thing we all took away from 2020? Apart from an irrational affinity for toilet paper - Supporting local businesses! We were forced to (and leaned into) getting more involved in our direct community, and nurturing the artisans and business owners that were down the street or around the corner. That is why we love the Raleigh Night Market. That, and of course, they are a super dog friendly outdoor event. You can ...

Raleigh, N.C. — What is one thing we all took away from 2020? Apart from an irrational affinity for toilet paper - Supporting local businesses! We were forced to (and leaned into) getting more involved in our direct community, and nurturing the artisans and business owners that were down the street or around the corner. That is why we love the Raleigh Night Market. That, and of course, they are a super dog friendly outdoor event. You can also get some energy out at any of the interactive booths – you can see for yourself (in the video with this article) how great I was at axe throwing (I’m pretty sure Dazey (my dog) was terrified).

Lauryn Colatuno, the co-founder of the Raleigh Night Market, was inspired by magical moments at similar markets while on her travels across Europe. These weekly, free-to-the-public markets offer entertainment for the whole family, food and beverages (yes, including beer and wine!) and the opportunity to engage with local business owners and re-invest into the community.

At the core of the Raleigh Night Market is hyper-localized collaboration. Even Lauryn and her co-founder Sara Buxton have partnered with The Hartwell for an outdoor market series this fall. They are hosting bimonthly outdoor markets in The Hartwell’s green space for additional opportunities to meet, greet and shop local artisans. You can swing by for the final Happy Hour on Thursday, Nov. 11 (4:30-7:30 p.m.) or get a great start to your weekend by attending the Saturday morning market on Oct. 30, or Nov. 6 (9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.). The Hartwell will also host an additional Holiday Market on Thursday Dec. 2nd from 4:30-9 p.m.

Lauryn is also excited about expanding the community-based markets into the Apex and Garner areas.

Thursday, Oct. 21's Raleigh Night Market will have a special moment for a family fighting cancer. Former owner of Brice's Brewing, Kris Bengston, recently found out his 5-year-old daughter, Julia, has leukemia. Bengston was diagnosed 3 years ago with a rare form of stage 4 cancer. His wife, Dana, underwent brain surgery six years ago.

Driveway Drag Show will perform Lizzo's "Good as Hell" (Julia's favorite song) at 7 p.m. on Martin Street in tribute to the family. The family has set up a GoFundMe to raise money to cover Julia's treatment.

Upcoming Market Dates

Apex Market (behind the Tobacco Mule Exchange in Downtown Apex)

Raleigh Night Market

Moore Square

Smoky Hollow

If you’re trying to get a jumpstart on your Holiday shopping, you can also attend the Holiday-specific market and get goodies for everyone on your list (including four legged, fur family members). Starting Friday Nov. 19, The Raleigh Night Market will host a Friday and Saturday Holiday market each weekend through Dec. 18 at Moore Square!

Lucy T is a millennial and native New Yorker who is new to the Raleigh area. Her passions in life are pugs, pinot and pizza. She is also the new Marketing Director at Artsplosure. She and her six year old pug, Dazey, will be exploring Raleigh with WRAL.com’s Out and About. Follow along with their adventures on Instagram as she discovers all Raleigh has to offer!

Swim And Dive Opens the Richmond Duals with a Win over Davidson

RICHMOND, Va. – The University of Richmond swim and dive team took on the Davidson Wildcats in the first round of the Richmond Duals Friday night. The Spiders earned a 162-137 victory over the Wildcats. The Spiders advance to take on the George Mason Patriots tomorrow morning after the Patriots defeated the East Carolina Pirates 166-105.Sophomores Megan Carson (Apex, N.C.) and ...

RICHMOND, Va. – The University of Richmond swim and dive team took on the Davidson Wildcats in the first round of the Richmond Duals Friday night. The Spiders earned a 162-137 victory over the Wildcats. The Spiders advance to take on the George Mason Patriots tomorrow morning after the Patriots defeated the East Carolina Pirates 166-105.

Sophomores Megan Carson (Apex, N.C.) and Petra Mijic (Split, Croatia) got the day started with a second and third place finish in the 1650 freestyle in times of 17:44.14 and 17:58.81, respectively.

The 200 medley relay team of Katelyn Pennell (Eden Prairie, Minn.), Sara Greene (Tega Cay, S.C.), Claire O'Shaughnessy (Laurel, Md.) and Lauren Medlin (Cary, N.C.) took first with a 1:45.44 time. Mattie Williams (Lake George, N.Y.), Christina Levins (Moorestown, N.J.), Abby Fuller (Charlottesville, Va.) and Lucy Yeomans (Athens, Ga.) finished third at 1:46.41.

Maggie Purcell (Southampton, N.Y.) took home the top time in the 200 freestyle at 1:53.09. Williams finished first in the 100 backstroke (58.51) and Greene was first in the 100 breaststroke (1:04.61). Freshman Levins took third at 1:06.06.

The duo of O'Shaughnessy and Emma Martin (Knoxville, Tenn.) took second and third in the 200 butterfly with times of 2:07.76 and 2:08.06, respectively. The 50 freestyle saw Fuller and Medlin finish 1-2, with Fuller taking the top time at 23.70, and Medlin at 23.89.

Purcell notched another first-place finish, this time with a 2:05.01 time in the 200 backstroke, followed by a third-place finish by freshman Carstyn Klosterman (Winston-Salem, N.C.) at 2:09.17.

Greene earned a first-place finish in the 200 breaststroke at 2:20.01. Medlin took first in the 100 freestyle, edging Davidson's Abby Francis by .01 seconds at 51.86. Yeomans was third at 52.79. The top Spider in the 500 freestyle was freshman Laura Davis (Charlotte, N.C.), finishing second at 5:06.64.

The 100 butterfly saw four Spiders take second through fifth. The finishers were Fuller (56.42), O'Shaughnessy (57.11), Rachel Pak (Fairfax, Va.) (58.96) and Greene (59.40), respectively.

Purcell added another top finish in the 200 IM at 2:06.25, and Davis added a 2:11.00 time for third.

The 400 freestyle relay closed the evening. The Spiders took the top two spots. The quartet of Medlin, Fuller, Yeomans and Purcell swam 3:30.88, and O'Shaughnessy, Palfreyman, Klosterman and Connors were second at 3:36.21.

At Robins Center Natatorium, the divers finished fourth and fifth in the 3-meter competition. Zazi Halla (McLean, Va.) finished at 201.25, and Emma Yeakley (Cornelius, N.C.) was fifth at 196.90. In the 1-meter competition, it was Halla taking third at 195.05, and Yeakley at 192.60 for fourth.

The Spiders are back in the pool tomorrow morning. Diving begins at 9:30, and swimming at 10:15.

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Get to know this farming family in Apex

Apex, N.C. — Kim and Nick Hosking run Triangle Urban Farm in Apex. What started as a small aeroponic farming operation in 2017 has since grown into a full-fledged family business. They have five children!WRAL caught up with Kim Hosking to find out how their business got started, what affect the pandemic had and what the future holds!WRAL: How did you start farming? Kim Hosking: How does a teacher a...

Apex, N.C. — Kim and Nick Hosking run Triangle Urban Farm in Apex. What started as a small aeroponic farming operation in 2017 has since grown into a full-fledged family business. They have five children!

WRAL caught up with Kim Hosking to find out how their business got started, what affect the pandemic had and what the future holds!

WRAL: How did you start farming?

Kim Hosking: How does a teacher and a veterinarian become lettuce farmer’s with the cutest local goods delivery van you have ever seen? As I often tell my kids, ‘we plan, God laughs.’ About 10 years ago, Nick and I had done it. We had checked all the boxes on the way to creating a ‘perfect life.’ Two beautiful kids, a nice house and successful careers. We had everything in the world, except we both felt stuck. In a busy season of life, it was so easy to just get carried downstream. Kind of by accident, we fell into a community of health minded individuals making one simple change at a time on the road to living life well. We really started to look at the relationship between nutrition and disease and how what we were putting into our bodies affected how we felt and experienced life.

Growing our own food was something we had always wanted to do, but lacked the time and skill to make it “worth it.” Enter Tower Garden, a vertical aeroponic growing system. This beautifully designed system allowed us to grow food, in a 2x2 foot space, simply. Before you know it we had tomatoes and cucumbers coming out of our ears and salad for days. Our one tower turned into three and our family was thriving together growing and eating our harvest.

There is something incredible about planting a seed and watching it grow and God used food to reconnect us with who we are. We got crystal clear on what we valued the most and decided that we were going to create a life for our family, not just a living.

With food, faith and family as our guide, we bought a $100 pop up greenhouse and decided that if we could grow our three towers over the winter, we could scale it, and that’s exactly what we did. Triangle Urban Farm was born in June 2017. With four babies in tow and another on the way, we began an adventure that would change us forever and continues to teach us lessons about life, love and sacrifice everyday.

WRAL: How did the pandemic change your business?

Kim Hosking: In many ways, for us, the pandemic was a huge blessing and an opportunity to serve. As it would have it, we had already started to shift from simply being Triangle Urban Farm to operating tuf Local. We had already forged a few meaningful relationships with incredible local partners and really leaned into the idea of ‘it takes a village.’

The early days of the pandemic were hard. They pushed all of us to grow in ways we didn’t know how. Everything changed, for everyone, which actually created this beautiful space where businesses were humanized and we all kind of tore down our walls and said, ‘how can we help each other? Some of my most cherished relationships were formed during the pandemic. We got to truly see people’s hearts and we aligned with the ones who met ours and because of it, our impact was greater. We are stronger together.

For our customers, in the simplest sense, we offered them a safe option to feed their families. However, the pandemic, in its sneaky way, had people thinking about their food in a whole new light. Men, women and children who never thought to ask the question, were now considering ‘who grew my food? And how many hands did it touch to get to my plate?’ The global pandemic actually brought the focus home. To families. To their kitchen. To their dinner table. The idea of local took its rightful place in the hearts of many and with that space open, tuf showed up to connect that family to the incredible people who were producing what they were searching for and that is where the magic happens. When a product is connected to a real person (the who) with a real story (the why), it is no longer just a product. It now carries meaning, not only for the producer, but for the consumer, which creates impact far beyond the kitchen table. The pandemic brought people to tuf for the safety and convenience, but they stayed for the people and the heart.

WRAL: What type of challenges have you faced?

Kim Hosking: Learning to farm on a commercial level, for one. We didn’t come into this with any experience outside of simply growing food for our family, so there was a huge learning curve, even with the simplicity of the tower garden. More than anything, we had to grow as people.

Choosing to live and work outside of the ‘traditional’ model and different from anything we had done and been trained to do, required Nick and I (and the kids!) to grow as humans. The beautiful part, though, is that as we did and continue to do, tuf seems to just evolve alongside us.

Enter the pandemic: Seemingly overnight, we went from farming to operating a logistics company. While the idea of tuf Local was in motion prior to the pandemic, once it hit and people were home, there were huge needs to serve. We weren’t just farming anymore, we were coordinating orders from our customers, engaging with our producers, harvesting produce and figuring out how to get it all from our farms to our families in the quickest amount of time with the fewest touch points possible. Oh yea, and the kids came home from school so we were also virtually teaching five kids to boot! If there has ever been a time when we leaned into this “family” business, it was 2020.

From top to bottom, every Hosking contributed in a huge way that year and while in the midst of it we never thought we would make it out, looking back, it has been the greatest period of growth and connection in all my life. Outside of the pandemic, and the constant need for personal growth, I always tell people that the hardest thing is discipline. Discipline to do the work and to stop doing the work. Being a farmer isn’t for the faint of heart. Neither is entrepreneurship. For us, all of this work takes place at home. We can’t ‘leave it at the office’ and the work we do is never enough, unless we decide that it is. Because we love what we do, it is easy to get caught up in the ‘what’s next,’ and so my greatest challenge is to not compromise the here and now for tomorrow.

WRAL: How has this business affected your family? Do you think it has provided teaching moments or more family togetherness?

Kim Hosking: Owning your own business is hard. Farming is hard. Raising kids is hard. Getting dinner on the table is hard. Life, in many aspects, is hard. But we try to lean into it and remind ourselves that we get to choose our hard every single day. Feeding the animals when it is early or we are tired from a long day requires sacrifice and fortitude, but the German pancake made by my 9 year old with hand gathered eggs for dinner? That is worth it. We ask a lot of each other and a lot of our children. More than many, I suspect, because they aren’t just a part of our life, they are a necessity to live this life. tuf is not just our business, it is our life and our children are right there with us, equal parts joy and sacrifice, experiencing the highs and lows of creating a life around what you love and finding the faith to keep going even when you want to give up. I am so very proud of who they are. Everyday I see them and know them and understand them in a way I don’t think I ever would have had we not chosen to do this. Our relationships are real and messy and deep. The courage to live by faith. To prioritize our family and what we value most. To walk away from the known into the unknown, together, forced us to accept our differences and give one another the freedom and support we all required to become who we needed to be and were meant to be. When we said ‘we are going to do it a different way,’ none of us could have imagined the depths of sacrifice or joy that tuf would bring and we could not be more grateful for every part of it.

WRAL: What is next for you and your business?

Kim Hosking: Cultivating community through food, faith and family. We fundamentally believe that food is foundational. It is a timeless tradition to sit and fellowship and break bread with the people you love and the people you don’t know you love yet. At the simplest level, we grow amazing lettuce and we source the most incredible products from small local businesses and home deliver to families across the triangle making it as simple as possible to choose local. We will always continue to do this with our whole hearts, but, we are more than just a grocery delivery service, we are storytellers and connectors and we are a family on a mission to empower others to bring back the kitchen table in their own homes and make meal time meaningful again.

You can find out more about Triangle Urban Farm on their website. Kim said they are planning more farm to table dinners and simple kitchen and garden workshops.

Devious Licks: TikTok trend encouraging school property damage hits central North Carolina schools

WAKE COUNTY, N.C. (WTVD) -- Hajnalka Kleiman found out about the "Devious Licks" TikTok trend on Facebook.It's a challenge where students focus on school bathrooms.The results have made national headlines because of the damage kids leave behind.In many instances, students break mirrors and rip down soap dispensers.Some also damage sinks and toilets."This is nothing harmless," Kleiman said. "This isn't 'Oh kids will be kids.' This is a serious offense to destroy property in that way....

WAKE COUNTY, N.C. (WTVD) -- Hajnalka Kleiman found out about the "Devious Licks" TikTok trend on Facebook.

It's a challenge where students focus on school bathrooms.

The results have made national headlines because of the damage kids leave behind.

In many instances, students break mirrors and rip down soap dispensers.

Some also damage sinks and toilets.

"This is nothing harmless," Kleiman said. "This isn't 'Oh kids will be kids.' This is a serious offense to destroy property in that way."

She has five kids and three of them said there was damage in their bathrooms--at Apex High School, Apex Middle and Ligon Magnet Middle School.

"At Ligon, the soap dispenses were stolen," Kleiman said. "You went in and you tried to use the soap but it was all gone and someone had opened them up and just taken the bag out that people use."

Apex Middle School put a note in their newsletter asking parents to have conversations with their kids "about the negative side of social media."

Cumberland County sent out a warning to the entire district.

"It just blows my mind that someone would think that's funny or worthy of a recording or a good idea," she said.

It started when a TikTok user posted a video of disposable masks being stolen with the caption, "A month into school absolutely devious lick. Should've brought a mask from home."

The incidents have caused more trouble for principals and administrators as masking debates continue and school officials nationwide prioritize in-person learning.

Hajnalka said her five kids aren't fans of TikTok but she's tried to educate them on where to draw the line.

"It's about being a good citizen," she said. "We've talked about what's a prank and what's vandalism and the idea is you don't want to ever hurt people or property. That's not funny and that's not a prank."

Wake County Schools said it is aware of the trend but they have not compiled a list of schools with damage.

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