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Restoration Experts of North Carolina

The Best Water Remediation in Chapel Hill, NC

For most homeowners, the thought of dealing with water damage is about as attractive as going to the dentist for a root canal, if not worse. If the recent destruction caused by Hurricane Ida taught us anything, it’s that water damage can be catastrophic. The source of water damage can come from many different sources, including natural causes like rainstorms and internal property issues like pipe bursts. From plumbing problems to full-on floods, water damage in Chapel Hill, NC, can weaken your home’s structure and even cause your family to fall ill. That’s why it is so important that you address water damage in your home as soon as possible.

At Restoration Experts of North Carolina, we understand that dealing with water damage can seem like a losing effort. With our team by your side, however, you don’t have to lose hope. We provide comprehensive water remediation in Chapel Hill, from initial documentation of your damage to the time that we mitigate your problem. With a team of IICRC certified technicians and high-tech inspection tools, we have the experience and the innovation to restore your home or business to its original beauty.

The Best Water Remediation
Service Areas

With years of experience in the water damage restoration industry, there is no project too small or complex for our team to handle. Our customers are our top priority, and there are no exceptions to that rule.

At the end of the day, our clients choose Restoration Experts of North Carolina for three reasons:

Trustworthy Water Damage Mitigation Services

Trustworthy Water Damage Mitigation Services

Our goal is to restore your losses using mitigation techniques whenever possible to help restore your property to its original condition. If reconstruction is required, we will handle every aspect of your loss through a single, dependable point of contact.

Transparent Restoration with NoHidden Fees

Transparent Restoration with NoHidden Fees

At Restoration Experts of North Carolina, we make it a priority to provide our customers with comprehensive documentation and step-by-step status updates. Our transparent business model makes it easy for our customers to understand our water remediation progress. That way, you know exactly where we’re at with your project and have a permanent record of your home or businesses’ restoration. You won’t ever have to worry about hidden fees, unauthorized charges, or annoying efforts to sell you additional products or services.

Re-Defining Full-Service Water Clean-Up in Chapel Hill

Re-Defining Full-Service Water Clean-Up in Chapel Hill

Our goal is to be your one-stop source for water remediation in North Carolina. To help achieve this goal, we offer a wide range of additional services on top of our already stellar water damage restoration services. We combine our unmatched expertise with strategic partnerships to better serve our customers. We can provide all you need, from interior design consultations and decorating services to replacement furniture and appliances for your home or business. We are committed to giving our customers informative, effective, streamlined water remediation services in Chapel Hill.

Common Signs of Water Damage in Chapel Hill, NC

Water damage can happen to any structure, from large storefronts in town to suburban homes outside of the city. Incidents that cause water damage can happen at any time, making them particularly hard to remediate for non-professionals. To make matters worse, spotting signs of water damage isn’t as easy as you might think. Some signs are obvious, while others are subtle and even hidden. However, one of the best ways to address water damage in your home or business is to keep a sharp eye out for the following signs, so that you can treat the problem quickly and get back to normal life.

Signs of Water Damage Outside

Looking for signs outside is a great place to start, as it can narrow down external sources of water leaks. Keep an eye out for the following signs outside:

  • Windows and Door Frames: Check to see if there is any separation between your windows and door frames. Even small separations can lead to moisture leaking into your home or business, leading to mold growth.
  • Cracked or Missing Shingles: Severe rainstorms, tornadoes, and hurricanes are notorious for causing extensive water damage. Powerful natural disasters often strip residential and commercial roofs of shingles and flashing. When this happens, water can leak in through your roof and cause a litany of issues.
  • Ground Slope: Double check that your structure is sitting on the highest point on your property, with the ground sloping away from your home or business. If the ground slopes towards your home, you may be looking at water accumulation problems. When this happens, your foundation is at risk because water will accumulate on the sides of your structure. Eventually, this water can find its way inside.
Signs of Water Damage Inside

After you’re done checking for signs of water damage outside, it’s time to move indoors. Obviously, if you spot any of the following signs, your family could be at risk. It’s important to call Restoration Experts of North Carolina to schedule an inspection to determine the extent of your damage.

  • Sagging Spots on Floor: Sagging occurs around showers, sinks, and bathtubs. Also, check around appliances like dishwashers, water heaters, and washing machines.
  • Water Rings: Look for water rings on your ceilings and walls, as they can be signs of leaky pipes. It’s a good idea to check for water rings regularly, even if you don’t suspect any water damage.
  • Warped Tiles: Water damage to wood and laminate flooring will cause it to warp, bend, and split. Be sure to go out of your way to inspect areas that you might not think of checking, like corners of rooms you don’t go in often.
  • Musty Smell: If you suspect water damage is occurring, trust your sense of smell. If odors of must or mildew are present, you likely have water damage in some form.
  • Rust: Examine your water heater for signs of rust, which can indicate a current or past leak.
  • Watermarks: Check inside and under your cabinets, especially in your bathrooms and kitchen areas. If you see signs of discoloration and warping, you could have water damage in your home or business due to a leaking pipe.

Risks of Water Damage in Chapel Hill, NC

If your home or business was recently flooded or you have had recent water damage, it is crucial to dry out your home or place of work ASAP. There are many risks associated with floods and leaks. One of the most common risks in situations like these is when water becomes contaminated. Contamination can happen when a sewer pipe bursts or a body of water floods into your home, like from a river or creek. Contaminated water often contains bacteria and microorganisms that can result in serious conditions like giardia. Even clean water can be a risk when stands for too long, since mosquitoes and other bugs breed in such conditions. Bugs that die in the water and critters that hatch eggs spread bacteria and attract even more bugs to the area.

After water recedes, the dampness left behind can cause fungus and mold growth – both of which can be detrimental to your health, especially if you have respiratory issues like asthma or have allergies.

Whether you have a small damp spot in your basement or severe flooding from a storm, do not take water damage lightly. Waiting to fix the issue will have a huge impact on your wallet, and more importantly, your family’s health.

Restoration Experts of North Carolina utilize the latest high-tech inspection tools like thermal imaging to discover the extent of your water damage. Using pumps, we extract the water and then use high-powered fans and heaters until your business or home is dry. While we’re drying your property, our team monitors and documents the entire process. We also specifically address any health hazards that can be associated with more severe categories of water damage.

If your property has flooded, you could be at risk from the following kinds of water leaks:
Clean Water
Clean Water

this water comes from broken or frozen pipes, failed water heaters, roof leaks, ice maker hoses, and more.

Grey Water
Grey Water

grey water is contaminated due to soiling like body oils, laundry soils, food stains, etc. This type of water often originates from dishwashers, washing machines, tub overflows, and hot tubs.

Black Water
Black Water

this type of water contains thousands of bacteria, protozoa, and disease-causing viruses. Black water most often comes from septic back-ups and overflows, sewer leaks, and toilet overflows.

What to Do When You Have Water Damage in Chapel Hill, NC

When your property floods, the first step you should take is to call a qualified contractor to help facilitate your water clean-up in Chapel Hill, NC. Restoration Experts of North Carolina has restored countless water losses and knows what needs to be done to get your home or business back to pre-loss condition. In situations like these, you must act fast to prevent damages and illnesses. Also, many home insurance policies require the homeowner to do everything in their power to protect the property from further damage. That’s where Restoration Experts of North Carolina comes in. We’ll bill your insurance company directly and will handle all the necessary water remediation work, so that you can focus on your family and your day-to-day responsibilities. Our team is on-call 24-hours a day and will be on our way to your home or business fast.

Since it'll take us a few minutes to arrive, consider the following pointers to help minimize property damage and speed up the restoration of your home:

  • If water has come from a contaminated source like your toilet, avoid all contact with the water.
  • If you do come into contact, clean yourself as soon as possible.
  • If safely accessible, turn off the source of water.
  • Turn off all power to the affected areas if circuit breakers are safe to access.
  • Remove we books, newspapers, rugs, and other such items. They will stain your home.
  • Blot pooling water with a mop or towels.
  • Remove water-sensitive items from wet areas. Prop them up in a dry, safe place.
  • Prevent additional damage to your furniture by placing plywood or foil underneath the legs.
  • Hang curtains and drapes that are wet in a dry room.
  • Avoid using fans or any electrical devices when standing on wet flooring.
  • Wait for professionals to dry your home or business. Do not use a standard vacuum cleaner, as water can damage these devices.
Steps to Take if You Have Sewage

Steps to Take if You Have Sewage or Black Water Damage

First things first – call Restoration Experts of North Carolina ASAP if you know for a fact that you have a black water leak. Black water contains disease-causing viruses and a plethora of bacteria that can be harmful to you or your children. If a sewage line leaks or your toilet overflows significantly, use our 24-hour emergency line, and our team will come to your location quickly. Until we arrive, take these steps to minimize black water damage in Chapel Hill, NC.

  • Stay far away from areas affected by black water.
  • Plug all of your toilets with a string mop or wadded rags if you have had an overflow event.
  • Turn off your HVAC system. Cover exposed vents to prevent water from infiltrating your air ducts.
  • If the source of black water is coming from outside, be sure to turn off all water connections at their entry points.

Restoration Experts of North Carolina is Here for You

Whether your home was flooded from a hailstorm or you have an overflowing dishwasher, we are here to help. Our primary goal is to provide your family or customers with the most effective water remediation in Chapel Hill, NC. That way, you can rest easy knowing you have a team of professionals on your side who are qualified and capable of full-serve water clean-up. Remember, if your home is affected by water damage, time is of the essence.

We’re only a call away from keeping your home or business dry and safe.
Contact us

Latest News in Chapel Hill

$2M grant to UNC-Chapel Hill program will rebuild, fortify local economies across North Carolina and beyond

(Chapel Hill, N.C., Oct. 20, 2021) – Today, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill announced new programming that will transform economically distressed communities hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic. Focusing on powerful partnerships, the programs will help build resilient local economies with more job opportunities and business growth in North Carolina and across the country.A $2 million grant from the Truist Foundation will fund the Anchor Institutions Create Economic Resilience program, or AICER, housed at CREATE, an...

(Chapel Hill, N.C., Oct. 20, 2021) – Today, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill announced new programming that will transform economically distressed communities hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic. Focusing on powerful partnerships, the programs will help build resilient local economies with more job opportunities and business growth in North Carolina and across the country.

A $2 million grant from the Truist Foundation will fund the Anchor Institutions Create Economic Resilience program, or AICER, housed at CREATE, an economic development center at UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School’s Frank Hawkins Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise. The AICER program works with anchor institutions – such as universities, tribal and local governments, and hospitals – to source their goods and services from minority-owned firms, rural businesses and local suppliers in COVID-impacted communities.

“Carolina’s mission is to use our scholarship, research and expertise to work alongside communities in our state and beyond to improve lives,” said UNC-Chapel Hill Chancellor Kevin M. Guskiewicz. “This grant from the Truist Foundation enables the AICER program to do that by putting Carolina expertise to work and helping shape more resilient local economies, starting here in North Carolina.”

Funding from the Truist Foundation will enable experts at Carolina to work alongside six anchor institutions from across the country to assess their current procurement practices and identify opportunities for purchasing goods and services from targeted businesses. AICER will offer local businesses guidance and technical assistance to work through the procurement process while connecting business owners to resources as needed to help ensure success. This grant also continues the AICER program’s ongoing work with two anchor institutions within the UNC System: UNC-Chapel Hill and UNC Pembroke.

“The economic consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic have been significant, particularly for historically overlooked communities,” said Lynette Bell, president of the Truist Foundation. “Truist Foundation is committed to not only helping these communities rebuild but also to building wealth, institutional and economic power. This grant to UNC-Chapel Hill will ensure their resiliency and sustainability.”

Additionally, the program will facilitate connections with the Institute for Innovation at the UNC School of Law to help guide small businesses and nonprofit organizations through the legal aspects of the contract process. The project will also create a national AICER Partners Network to share resources, feedback and lessons learned among partners.

“The United States is experiencing the greatest level of income and wealth inequality since the 1920s, and the pandemic has exacerbated the challenges for workers trying to improve their economic futures,” said Mark Little, executive director of CREATE. “We believe that intentional procurement policies and practices will enable anchor institutions to support a robust economic recovery, more resilient supply chains and long-term sustainable economic development across the nation.”

Funding from the Truist Foundation also continues support of SmartUp, a place-based equitable economic development program. In 2019, SmartUp launched to accelerate growing companies and create jobs for diverse populations in North Carolina’s Elizabeth City and Triad regions along with South Carolina’s Lowcountry. The AICER and SmartUp programs prioritize communities with high African American, Latino or Native American populations, as these groups have experienced disproportionately negative economic outcomes due to COVID-19.

“This is an investment in the AICER program, as well as the anchor institutions and the small and minority-owned businesses that will benefit from the guidance, expertise and business growth that this grant will help unlock,” said Chris Bell, Triangle regional president for Truist, speaking on behalf of the Truist Foundation. “Truist is committed to inspire and build better lives and communities, and AICER will help provide economic stability and opportunity to individuals and communities in North Carolina and across the U.S.”

To learn more about the AICER program, visit the CREATE website at createprosperity.unc.edu.

This gift from the Truist Foundation counts toward the Campaign For Carolina, the University’s most ambitious fundraising campaign in history, launched in October 2017 with a goal to raise $4.25 billion by December 2022.

-Carolina-

About CREATE Housed within the Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise at UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School, CREATE is an economic development center that drives shared economic prosperity through thought leadership, real interventions and policy development. CREATE envisions a community, state, nation and world where the economy works to equitably distribute resources and wealth; where individuals and communities are empowered to achieve their goals; and where all have opportunities to prosper. CREATE works to bring this vision to life by generating innovative research and new data; delivering on-the-ground applied technical assistance; and informing local, state, national and international policy. CREATE operates six major programs: NCGrowth; SmartUp; CREATE Prosperity Research Network; Homegrown Tools; Black Communities: A Conference for Collaboration; and AICER. Learn more at createprosperity.unc.edu.

About the Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise at UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School The Frank Hawkins Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise develops and promotes innovative, market-based solutions to vital economic issues. With the belief that private enterprise is the cornerstone of a prosperous and free society, the institute fosters the entrepreneurial spirit to stimulate economic prosperity and improve the lives of people in North Carolina, across the country and around the world. Learn more at kenaninstitute.unc.edu.

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 107 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools, including the College of Arts & Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 340,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, U.S. territories and 159 countries. More than 185,000 live in North Carolina.

About Truist Foundation The Truist Foundation is committed to Truist Financial Corporation’s (NYSE: TFC) purpose to inspire and build better lives and communities. Established in 2020, the foundation makes strategic investments in nonprofit organizations to help ensure the communities it serves have more opportunities for a better quality of life. The Truist Foundation’s grants and activities focus on building career pathways to economic mobility and strengthening small businesses. Learn more at Truist.com/Foundation.

University Communications: 919-445-8555; mediarelations@unc.edu Truist: media@truist.com

New Himalayan Restaurant Aims to Open in Downtown Chapel Hill

A new restaurant is poised to join Chapel Hill’s downtown area in the coming weeks.The Triangle Business Journal reported on Tuesday that Momo’s Master, which is described as a Himalayan bistro, is set to operate out of 110 North Columbia Street near Franklin Street.The restaurant, which will take over a space left empty since the Thai restaurant Sawasdee closed, w...

A new restaurant is poised to join Chapel Hill’s downtown area in the coming weeks.

The Triangle Business Journal reported on Tuesday that Momo’s Master, which is described as a Himalayan bistro, is set to operate out of 110 North Columbia Street near Franklin Street.

The restaurant, which will take over a space left empty since the Thai restaurant Sawasdee closed, will serve various types of momos, a style of dumpling popular in places like Tibet and Nepal.

The Triangle Business Journal said the restaurant will be run by Ramesh Dahal, a chef with experience from the Angus Barn in Raleigh and La Farm Bakery in Cary. Dahal is native to the Nepal region and took culinary courses there before cooking in Iraq, Somalia and the southern United States.

The Downtown Chapel Hill Partnership, a nonprofit that aims to help and promote businesses, confirmed the news on Tuesday across social media.

We are super excited to enjoy delicious dumplings from Momo's Master soon — learn more about the new restaurant opening on Columbia St. soon (via @TriBizRetail//@TriangleBIZJrnl).https://t.co/i5luE7FMzw https://t.co/rgDTN5Kiis

— Downtown Chapel Hill (@DCHP_ChapelHill) October 19, 2021

In addition to Sawasdee closing, two restaurants in that same stretch of downtown Chapel Hill closed in 2020. Lula’s, a fried chicken restaurant that opened in the space long occupied by Spanky’s, closed in June 2020, while Lotsa Stone-Fired Pizza across the street closed a few months before. In July, the Guilford County-based food truck Seafood Destiny announced plans to open in the space previously housing Lotsa.

Dahal told Triangle Business Journal he plans to hire a group of people this fall before expanding to more than a dozen employees next year. To read his full comment’s about the inspiration for the restaurant, click here.

Momo’s Master in Chapel Hill plans to open to the public in November, according to the report.

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Wellness Day resources and Support Centers

Editor’s Note: On Oct. 13, based on participation, the University consolidated Community Support Center staff to be available at SASB, Granville, Health Science Library and Davis Library. Visit the Student Affairs website for more information on the times at each location. Dear Carolina Community,In a message to campus yesterday, I announced that tomorrow, Oct. 12, will be a Wellness Day f...

Editor’s Note: On Oct. 13, based on participation, the University consolidated Community Support Center staff to be available at SASB, Granville, Health Science Library and Davis Library. Visit the Student Affairs website for more information on the times at each location.

Dear Carolina Community,

In a message to campus yesterday, I announced that tomorrow, Oct. 12, will be a Wellness Day for students and classes will be canceled. Tomorrow and throughout the week, we are offering a variety of resources to support our community. While recent events on campus this semester brought this mental health crisis and its impacts into sharp focus, please know that we are committed to providing sustainable support for our community beyond one day or week. We will continue to communicate with you about a variety of support systems in the coming weeks.

Community Support Centers

We will convene spaces across campus staffed with experts from Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS), the Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine and School of Social Work. We encourage students, faculty and staff to come together, process their feelings and talk about their experiences.

The locations listed below will be available during the following times with the exception of SASB:

Group session: Basement Study Lounge Private sessions: Rooms 2121, 2123, 2125

Group session: Community Office, Room 10H (Residents should visit the Ram One Community Office, and they will be directed from there.)

Group session: Community Office, Room 115 (Residents should visit the Hinton James Community Office, and they will be directed from there.)

Group session: Upendo Room 1118 Private session: Room 1114 Tuesday, Oct. 12, 8 to 10 a.m. and 12:45 to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 13, 8 to 9 a.m. and noon to 4 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 14, 8 to 10 a.m. and 11 a.m to 1 p.m. Friday, Oct. 15, 8 to 10 a.m. and 11 a.m to 1 p.m.

Group session: Room 214 Private session: Room 216

Group session: Community Office, Room 146 (Residents should visit the Morrison Community Office, and they will be directed from there.)

Group session: Room 227 Private session: Room 321B

Group session: Anne Queen Faculty Lounge Private session: Room 103

Students may also seek support remotely. Visit the Student Affairs website to sign up for a virtual session. In addition, CAPS continues to offer in-person services for our students.

Other resources are also available:

If you are concerned about a student, friend or colleague who is struggling, please read this helpful information provided by CAPS.

While we recognize that our staff need to work on the Wellness Day, we encourage managers and supervisors to exercise flexibility whenever possible. Faculty and staff can also reach out to the Employee Assistance Program for resources and support.

In this critical time, the most important thing we can do is to support one another, and I hope we continue to do this as a community tomorrow and for the rest of this year and beyond.

Sincerely,

Kevin M. GuskiewiczChancellor

Carolina research leads to experimental pill to treat COVID-19

(CHAPEL HILL, N.C., Oct. 1, 2021) – Scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill say a twice-daily pill – molnupiravir — could change the way COVID-19 is treated. Today’s announcement by Merck Co. to seek emergency authorization by the Food and Drug Administration reflects research and testing conducted at the UNC-Chapel Hill....

(CHAPEL HILL, N.C., Oct. 1, 2021) – Scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill say a twice-daily pill – molnupiravir — could change the way COVID-19 is treated. Today’s announcement by Merck Co. to seek emergency authorization by the Food and Drug Administration reflects research and testing conducted at the UNC-Chapel Hill.

Strong clinical trial results showed the experimental COVID-19 pill reduced hospitalizations and deaths by half in people recently infected with coronavirus. UNC-Chapel Hill began working on molnupiravir in 2016 and demonstrated the drug could be a weapon against coronaviruses and future pandemics.

“This is a real game changer for a pandemic like COVID-19 because it allows us to treat people quicker with a method that’s convenient and accessible,” said William A. Fischer II, an associate professor of pulmonology and critical care at the UNC School of Medicine and director of emerging pathogens at the UNC Institute for Global Health and Infectious Diseases.

Fischer led a phase 2 clinical trial with Merck and Ridgeback Biotherapeutics that set the stage for further patient testing and the latest findings. If approved by the FDA, the first pill to treat COVID-19 could be available by the end of the year.

The UNC-Chapel Hill led study revealed those who took molnupiravir at their first sign of COVID-19 symptoms cleared coronavirus faster than those in a placebo group. After five days, tests were unable to detect the virus in volunteers who took the antiviral pill twice a day.

Molnupiravir was discovered at Emory University and originally designed to fight flu. But animal testing at UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health, Vanderbilt University and Emory showed it blocked transmission of the virus that causes COVID-19 and reduced lung damage. The drug also inhibited coronavirus in recent studies at UNC School of Medicine using human lung cells.

Timothy Sheahan, a virologist at UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health and pioneer of antiviral drug research along with Ralph Baric, Kenan Distinguished Professor of Epidemiology at UNC-Chapel Hill, led a pivotal study of the broad-spectrum antiviral.

“We were the first to show it worked against lots of different coronaviruses in cells and culture and animal models of coronavirus disease,” Sheahan said. “The work that we did at Gillings School of Global Public Health demonstrated that molnupiravir was effective at stopping all the coronaviruses we tested in the lab including SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, common cold-causing coronaviruses and emerging coronaviruses like SARS, and MERS.”

The oral antiviral drug works by preventing the virus from making copies of itself.

“Currently the approved antivirals to treat COVID-19 have to be injected so that limits rollout or access to those who are sick,” Sheahan said. “The power of an oral antiviral drug is to stop people from going to the hospital.”

Molnupiravir could fill an important role in preventing transmission and helping people who are sick, but still at home.

“If diagnosed with COVID-19, you could immediately go to the drugstore to pick up an antiviral. If it does its job correctly it should make you less sick and shorten the duration of the disease and prevent you from transmitting the virus to others in your household,” Sheahan said.

More than a year into the pandemic, and doctors and COVID-19 patients have few treatment options. Only one drug has been authorized for use: remdesivir, a treatment used to speed recovery that UNC-Chapel Hill identified as a potential COVID-19 treatment. Unlike remdesivir, which has to be given intravenously at a hospital, molnupiravir can be swallowed as a pill.

“At UNC-Chapel Hill we have really invested in the development of preclinical compounds that look good in cells and animals, but also extended that work into the clinical space so that we can identify compounds that are safe and effective before the next outbreak,” Fischer said. “This is work that’s happening every day at Carolina.”

Chapel Hill Town Council’s Buansi Announces Campaign for NC District 56

Early voting in Orange County local government elections is just a few weeks away. But one Chapel Hill Town Council member has his sights set on a primary election in 2022.Allen Buansi is preparing a campaign to run for District 56 in the North Carolina House of Representatives. The INDY Week magazine first announced the news on Monday, with Buansi later confirming his plans to Chapelboro.The district seat, currently held by Rep. Verla Insko, chiefly represents the area of Chapel Hill and Carrboro in the state General Assembly....

Early voting in Orange County local government elections is just a few weeks away. But one Chapel Hill Town Council member has his sights set on a primary election in 2022.

Allen Buansi is preparing a campaign to run for District 56 in the North Carolina House of Representatives. The INDY Week magazine first announced the news on Monday, with Buansi later confirming his plans to Chapelboro.

The district seat, currently held by Rep. Verla Insko, chiefly represents the area of Chapel Hill and Carrboro in the state General Assembly. But it is expected to be vacant in the next year, as Insko announced on September 15 she does not wish to run for re-election.

Buansi announced earlier in the year he would not seek re-election himself, finishing off the four-year term of his seat on Chapel Hill’s Town Council. The city attorney served just one term and told INDY Week he was stepping aside to spend more time with his newborn children.

With Insko’s announcement, though, Buansi said he believes he’ll be able to tend to family duties while mounting a campaign for a state seat opening in December 2022.

“It’s a real opportunity to take the work that we’ve been doing in Chapel Hill to the state level,” Buansi told INDY Week. “Work that is centered in making our state and our community more affordable, more accessible, more inclusive, through the state legislature.”

Buansi is not the first community member to announce plans to run for District 56. Jonah Garson, a lawyer and Chapel Hill native, stepped down from his role as president of the Orange County Democratic Party last week to begin his own campaign for Insko’s seat.

A Chapel Hill native, Buansi attended Guy B. Phillips Middle School and East Chapel Hill High School before earning his Juris Doctorate in law at the UNC School of Law. In addition to working for the City of Greensboro, he also serves as the Governor’s appointee on the statewide Local Government Employees’ Retirement Board of Trustees and on the State Board of Common Cause North Carolina.

Buansi’s seat on the Chapel Hill Town Council is one of three open seats in this fall’s election. Learn more about who has filed to run in races across Orange County here.

Photo via INDY Week/Allen Buansi.

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