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Restoration Experts of North Carolina

The Best Water Remediation in Durham, NC

For most homeowners, the thought of dealing with water damage is about as attractive as going to the dentist for a root canal, if not worse. If the recent destruction caused by Hurricane Ida taught us anything, it’s that water damage can be catastrophic. The source of water damage can come from many different sources, including natural causes like rainstorms and internal property issues like pipe bursts. From plumbing problems to full-on floods, water damage in Durham, NC, can weaken your home’s structure and even cause your family to fall ill. That’s why it is so important that you address water damage in your home as soon as possible.

At Restoration Experts of North Carolina, we understand that dealing with water damage can seem like a losing effort. With our team by your side, however, you don’t have to lose hope. We provide comprehensive water remediation in Durham, from initial documentation of your damage to the time that we mitigate your problem. With a team of IICRC certified technicians and high-tech inspection tools, we have the experience and the innovation to restore your home or business to its original beauty.

The Best Water Remediation
Service Areas

With years of experience in the water damage restoration industry, there is no project too small or complex for our team to handle. Our customers are our top priority, and there are no exceptions to that rule.

At the end of the day, our clients choose Restoration Experts of North Carolina for three reasons:

Trustworthy Water Damage Mitigation Services

Trustworthy Water Damage Mitigation Services

Our goal is to restore your losses using mitigation techniques whenever possible to help restore your property to its original condition. If reconstruction is required, we will handle every aspect of your loss through a single, dependable point of contact.

Transparent Restoration with NoHidden Fees

Transparent Restoration with NoHidden Fees

At Restoration Experts of North Carolina, we make it a priority to provide our customers with comprehensive documentation and step-by-step status updates. Our transparent business model makes it easy for our customers to understand our water remediation progress. That way, you know exactly where we’re at with your project and have a permanent record of your home or businesses’ restoration. You won’t ever have to worry about hidden fees, unauthorized charges, or annoying efforts to sell you additional products or services.

Re-Defining Full-Service Water Clean-Up in Durham

Re-Defining Full-Service Water Clean-Up in Durham

Our goal is to be your one-stop source for water remediation in North Carolina. To help achieve this goal, we offer a wide range of additional services on top of our already stellar water damage restoration services. We combine our unmatched expertise with strategic partnerships to better serve our customers. We can provide all you need, from interior design consultations and decorating services to replacement furniture and appliances for your home or business. We are committed to giving our customers informative, effective, streamlined water remediation services in Durham.

Common Signs of Water Damage in Durham, NC

Water damage can happen to any structure, from large storefronts in town to suburban homes outside of the city. Incidents that cause water damage can happen at any time, making them particularly hard to remediate for non-professionals. To make matters worse, spotting signs of water damage isn’t as easy as you might think. Some signs are obvious, while others are subtle and even hidden. However, one of the best ways to address water damage in your home or business is to keep a sharp eye out for the following signs, so that you can treat the problem quickly and get back to normal life.

Signs of Water Damage Outside

Looking for signs outside is a great place to start, as it can narrow down external sources of water leaks. Keep an eye out for the following signs outside:

  • Windows and Door Frames: Check to see if there is any separation between your windows and door frames. Even small separations can lead to moisture leaking into your home or business, leading to mold growth.
  • Cracked or Missing Shingles: Severe rainstorms, tornadoes, and hurricanes are notorious for causing extensive water damage. Powerful natural disasters often strip residential and commercial roofs of shingles and flashing. When this happens, water can leak in through your roof and cause a litany of issues.
  • Ground Slope: Double check that your structure is sitting on the highest point on your property, with the ground sloping away from your home or business. If the ground slopes towards your home, you may be looking at water accumulation problems. When this happens, your foundation is at risk because water will accumulate on the sides of your structure. Eventually, this water can find its way inside.
Signs of Water Damage Inside

After you’re done checking for signs of water damage outside, it’s time to move indoors. Obviously, if you spot any of the following signs, your family could be at risk. It’s important to call Restoration Experts of North Carolina to schedule an inspection to determine the extent of your damage.

  • Sagging Spots on Floor: Sagging occurs around showers, sinks, and bathtubs. Also, check around appliances like dishwashers, water heaters, and washing machines.
  • Water Rings: Look for water rings on your ceilings and walls, as they can be signs of leaky pipes. It’s a good idea to check for water rings regularly, even if you don’t suspect any water damage.
  • Warped Tiles: Water damage to wood and laminate flooring will cause it to warp, bend, and split. Be sure to go out of your way to inspect areas that you might not think of checking, like corners of rooms you don’t go in often.
  • Musty Smell: If you suspect water damage is occurring, trust your sense of smell. If odors of must or mildew are present, you likely have water damage in some form.
  • Rust: Examine your water heater for signs of rust, which can indicate a current or past leak.
  • Watermarks: Check inside and under your cabinets, especially in your bathrooms and kitchen areas. If you see signs of discoloration and warping, you could have water damage in your home or business due to a leaking pipe.

Risks of Water Damage in Durham, NC

If your home or business was recently flooded or you have had recent water damage, it is crucial to dry out your home or place of work ASAP. There are many risks associated with floods and leaks. One of the most common risks in situations like these is when water becomes contaminated. Contamination can happen when a sewer pipe bursts or a body of water floods into your home, like from a river or creek. Contaminated water often contains bacteria and microorganisms that can result in serious conditions like giardia. Even clean water can be a risk when stands for too long, since mosquitoes and other bugs breed in such conditions. Bugs that die in the water and critters that hatch eggs spread bacteria and attract even more bugs to the area.

After water recedes, the dampness left behind can cause fungus and mold growth – both of which can be detrimental to your health, especially if you have respiratory issues like asthma or have allergies.

Whether you have a small damp spot in your basement or severe flooding from a storm, do not take water damage lightly. Waiting to fix the issue will have a huge impact on your wallet, and more importantly, your family’s health.

Restoration Experts of North Carolina utilize the latest high-tech inspection tools like thermal imaging to discover the extent of your water damage. Using pumps, we extract the water and then use high-powered fans and heaters until your business or home is dry. While we’re drying your property, our team monitors and documents the entire process. We also specifically address any health hazards that can be associated with more severe categories of water damage.

If your property has flooded, you could be at risk from the following kinds of water leaks:
Clean Water
Clean Water

this water comes from broken or frozen pipes, failed water heaters, roof leaks, ice maker hoses, and more.

Grey Water
Grey Water

grey water is contaminated due to soiling like body oils, laundry soils, food stains, etc. This type of water often originates from dishwashers, washing machines, tub overflows, and hot tubs.

Black Water
Black Water

this type of water contains thousands of bacteria, protozoa, and disease-causing viruses. Black water most often comes from septic back-ups and overflows, sewer leaks, and toilet overflows.

What to Do When You Have Water Damage in Durham, NC

When your property floods, the first step you should take is to call a qualified contractor to help facilitate your water clean-up in Durham, NC. Restoration Experts of North Carolina has restored countless water losses and knows what needs to be done to get your home or business back to pre-loss condition. In situations like these, you must act fast to prevent damages and illnesses. Also, many home insurance policies require the homeowner to do everything in their power to protect the property from further damage. That’s where Restoration Experts of North Carolina comes in. We’ll bill your insurance company directly and will handle all the necessary water remediation work, so that you can focus on your family and your day-to-day responsibilities. Our team is on-call 24-hours a day and will be on our way to your home or business fast.

Since it'll take us a few minutes to arrive, consider the following pointers to help minimize property damage and speed up the restoration of your home:

  • If water has come from a contaminated source like your toilet, avoid all contact with the water.
  • If you do come into contact, clean yourself as soon as possible.
  • If safely accessible, turn off the source of water.
  • Turn off all power to the affected areas if circuit breakers are safe to access.
  • Remove we books, newspapers, rugs, and other such items. They will stain your home.
  • Blot pooling water with a mop or towels.
  • Remove water-sensitive items from wet areas. Prop them up in a dry, safe place.
  • Prevent additional damage to your furniture by placing plywood or foil underneath the legs.
  • Hang curtains and drapes that are wet in a dry room.
  • Avoid using fans or any electrical devices when standing on wet flooring.
  • Wait for professionals to dry your home or business. Do not use a standard vacuum cleaner, as water can damage these devices.
Steps to Take if You Have Sewage

Steps to Take if You Have Sewage or Black Water Damage

First things first – call Restoration Experts of North Carolina ASAP if you know for a fact that you have a black water leak. Black water contains disease-causing viruses and a plethora of bacteria that can be harmful to you or your children. If a sewage line leaks or your toilet overflows significantly, use our 24-hour emergency line, and our team will come to your location quickly. Until we arrive, take these steps to minimize black water damage in Durham, NC.

  • Stay far away from areas affected by black water.
  • Plug all of your toilets with a string mop or wadded rags if you have had an overflow event.
  • Turn off your HVAC system. Cover exposed vents to prevent water from infiltrating your air ducts.
  • If the source of black water is coming from outside, be sure to turn off all water connections at their entry points.

Restoration Experts of North Carolina is Here for You

Whether your home was flooded from a hailstorm or you have an overflowing dishwasher, we are here to help. Our primary goal is to provide your family or customers with the most effective water remediation in Durham, NC. That way, you can rest easy knowing you have a team of professionals on your side who are qualified and capable of full-serve water clean-up. Remember, if your home is affected by water damage, time is of the essence.

We’re only a call away from keeping your home or business dry and safe.
Contact us

Latest News in Durham

‘Like a golf cart on steroids.’ NC fire chiefs experience a fully-electric fire truck

When the City of Durham made a commitment to be carbon neutral by 2040, many of the strategies, such as solar panels and electric cars, were obvious.Less clear was what to do about the city’s fleet of diesel-burning fire trucks.“This was the piece that our fleet management folks said would be the hard part,” said City Council membe...

When the City of Durham made a commitment to be carbon neutral by 2040, many of the strategies, such as solar panels and electric cars, were obvious.

Less clear was what to do about the city’s fleet of diesel-burning fire trucks.

“This was the piece that our fleet management folks said would be the hard part,” said City Council member Javiera Caballero.

Caballero was speaking from the driver’s seat of an all-electric fire truck, one of only a handful in the world. The manufacturer, Rosenbauer America, brought it to Durham this week to demonstrate it for city officials and members of any other fire department in the region that wanted to see what the company calls the future of fire trucks.

“To see this in action is incredible, and I’m really excited,” Caballero said. “And I think the city employees are, too, because this was the piece — you hope it’s coming but to know that it is coming is exciting.”

Coming, but still not quite here. The truck in Durham, the RT for “Revolutionary Technology,” was built seven years ago in Austria as a concept model, and the pumps, hoses and other equipment aren’t configured for American fire departments.

Still, seeing an electric fire truck in person is a chance to get a feel for the idea and begin to think about how it would work in Durham, said Robert Zoldos, the city’s fire chief.

“Is this the fire engine for the future of Durham? No,” Zoldos said. “But it may be Version 2 or Version 3. So we wanted to start investigating this now before it gets too far past us.”

Rosenbauer has started to sell the all-electric trucks; the first went into service in Berlin, Germany, last winter, followed by one each in Amsterdam and Dubai. The City of Los Angeles will begin using the first American version early next year, and the company plans to begin building them at its plant in Minnesota in 2023, said Mark Fusco, vice president of sales and marketing.

The truck has a six-cylinder BMW diesel engine, but that’s used only to recharge the batteries. It kicks on automatically when the batteries are at 20%. In 440 fire calls in Berlin, the engine came on only twice, Fusco said, and both times it was as the truck was returning to the station.

Without a large diesel engine and powertrain, the Rosenbauer electric truck is shorter than other fire trucks and sits lower to the ground. When the truck is parked, the step in and out of the crew compartment is only 7 inches off the ground, which is safer and easier for firefighters carrying heavy gear. The hydraulic suspension will lift the truck up to 30 inches off the ground for high water and other obstacles.

The truck is also silent while parked and nearly so while in motion, so firefighters can “use their inside voices” on their way to a call, said Tripp Evans, president of the company that will sell the trucks in North Carolina.

But when Rosenbauer driver Steve John took Caballero and others for rides, what he wanted them to see and feel was the truck’s maneuverability. John sprinted from one spot to another and took turns hard as he circled the fire academy training grounds off East Club Boulevard.

In urban areas, fire trucks are mostly dashing from one intersection to the next, John said.

“Now, finally, batteries and motors are big enough to be able to power all this weight,” he said.

Zoldos said the truck is “very quick,” but also stops well.

“The most dangerous part of a fire engine’s response is at an intersection,” he said. “This can get to the intersection and get out of it really, really fast.”

Corey Mercer, Rocky Mount’s fire chief, says he’d never been in a fire truck that could maneuver like the Rosenbauer.

“It’s kind of like a golf cart on steroids,” Mercer said.

Apex fire chief Keith McGee said he has read about electric fire trucks in trade magazines and was eager to see one in person. The town wants to be forward thinking in terms of technology and environmental sustainability, McGee said, so an electric fire truck will be a good fit someday.

Asked if there might be some resistance from firefighters used to brawny diesel trucks, McGee laughed.

“There’s a saying in the fire service: 100 years of tradition unimpeded by progress,” he said. “We’re growing out of that now.”

Zoldos is sold on the concept of electric vehicles; his wife lets him drive her Tesla every now and then. He thinks his department will soon have options for electric pickups and SUVs as utility vehicles for battalion chiefs and others.

Durham will have to explore how to incorporate charging stations for full-size fire trucks and get comfortable with paying the higher up-front cost for electric vehicles. Fusco said depending on how it’s configured the Rosenbauer would go for $1.1 million to $1.2 million but that savings on fuel and maintenance would make up for the higher cost in three to five years.

Rosenbauer has competition; Pierce Manufacturing of Wisconsin claims to have put North America’s first fully-electric fire truck into service earlier this year, though the truck is on loan to the City of Madison. Fusco said his company is the first in the world to bring one to market and hopes to sell more in the U.S. soon. The company is taking its concept truck on an East Coast tour and is heading to Charlotte next.

Topgolf sets a date for opening its first Triangle facility. Here’s what we know.

Topgolf is coming to Durham, with plans to open a three-story, 102-bay facility by the summer of 2022.Topgolf, which counted Carolina Hurricanes owner Tom Dundon among its early investors, couples a new-age golfing experience with acclaimed food and beverage. Its “high-tech gaming experience” features climate-controlled hitting bays where visitors can play a variety of simulated golf games.The new location — in the Park on Pag...

Topgolf is coming to Durham, with plans to open a three-story, 102-bay facility by the summer of 2022.

Topgolf, which counted Carolina Hurricanes owner Tom Dundon among its early investors, couples a new-age golfing experience with acclaimed food and beverage. Its “high-tech gaming experience” features climate-controlled hitting bays where visitors can play a variety of simulated golf games.

The new location — in the Park on Page development near Research Triangle Park — will be the company’s third North Carolina venue after two in Charlotte.

“We could not be more excited to bring the Topgolf experience to the Durham and Raleigh communities next year,” Topgolf Chief Development Officer Chris Callaway said in a press release.

“Whether you are a Hurricane, a Blue Devil, a Tar Heel, part of the Wolfpack, an Eagle or a Bulls fan, we can’t wait to welcome you to Topgolf when we open our newest venue at the Park on Page next year.”

The new Topgolf will serve as an anchor business in the 46-acre Park on Page development, just west of I-540 and I-40.

The business is expected to create almost 400 new jobs.

“We’re thrilled to welcome Topgolf to Durham and are excited for the new venue to complement the visitor attractions and other entertainment options in the area,” Susan Amey, president and CEO of Discover Durham, said in a release. “The sports and entertainment industry is burgeoning in the area and we’re proud to have Topgolf’s premier offerings added as a headliner.”

The announcement of its forthcoming Durham location follows about six years of Topgolf attempts to break into the Triangle market.

The Dallas-based company considered locations at Cary Crossroads and Cary Towne Center as early as 2014, but abandoned its efforts over residents’ concerns, The News & Observer previously reported.

In 2019, Topgolf renewed its campaign to locate a Triangle site, concentrating on Durham.

“We’re excited about the opportunity to bring Topgolf to Durham,” spokesman Todd Waldo told the Durham Joint City-County Planning Committee at the time. “We been looking for many years, and this opportunity is one that we feel is a good one for our company. We’re all about growing the game of golf in a fun and family-friendly environment.”

Topgolf has opened about 15 new locations around the world in the last two years. Durham’s venue will add to a global portfolio of more than 70 facilities, serving 20 million patrons each year, according to the company.

In March the company merged with Callaway Golf Company, with the latter assuming majority control.

For more information and updates on the Durham location’s progress, visit Topgolf’s website.

This story was originally published October 21, 2021 11:36 AM.

Durham mayor encouraging kids to trick-or-treat in small groups as COVID threat still exists

DURHAM, N.C. (WNCN) – While COVID cases have gone down, Durham Mayor Steve Schewel said Halloween will not be back to normal this year as there are still daily COVID infections reported in the community.Last year on Halloween, neighborhoods got creative by sending candy down chutes and some neighbors had kids pick up the candy at the curb.But this year, Schewel said trick-or-treating is encouraged if families take the right safety precautions.“Parents are still concerned because our kids are not vaccinated ye...

DURHAM, N.C. (WNCN) – While COVID cases have gone down, Durham Mayor Steve Schewel said Halloween will not be back to normal this year as there are still daily COVID infections reported in the community.

Last year on Halloween, neighborhoods got creative by sending candy down chutes and some neighbors had kids pick up the candy at the curb.

But this year, Schewel said trick-or-treating is encouraged if families take the right safety precautions.

“Parents are still concerned because our kids are not vaccinated yet and they’re still concerned about them being in large crowds,” Schewel said.

Schewel said that children can go trick-or-treating if they travel in small groups and he said they need to be masked up when approaching someone’s door.

Also in Durham this year trunk-or-treating will be permitted at churches, which is something that was not allowed last year.

In addition, Durham Parks and Recreation will be holding several in person events, many of them outdoors.

But some Durham parents, like Khedron Mims, are still not sure if they are ready to let their kids go trick-or-treating.

Mims has a nine-year-old daughter Hannah and he said he has concerns about letting her go trick-or-treating since she is not old enough to be vaccinated yet.

“You just don’t know how individuals are sanitizing or if individuals have been vaccinated,” Mims said.

Mims said he does plan to allow his daughter to take part in events held by the city or by local groups.

“Those events are a little bit more controlled, and they usually follow some of the CDC guidelines,” Mims said. “I think the kids are kind of suffering a little bit more, because they can’t get vaccinated. This is the time we have to be creative and make sure that we are having fun with our kids.”

CBS 17 reached out to the City of Raleigh to find out what their guidance is for Halloween and a spokesperson said that they have no guidelines, they’re just reminding everyone to stay safe.

Raleigh Parks and Recreations Department will be hold several in person Halloween events this year, while last year a lot of events were canceled or modified due to COVID.

In Cumberland County, the Sheriff’s Office is encouraging families to stay safe this Halloween and they are asking families there to go trick-or-treating on Saturday night, October 30th.

Meanwhile, Durham and Raleigh will be holding trick-or-treating events on Sunday, October 31st.

Here’s a link to Raleigh’s Parks and Recreations Events: Celebrate Halloween with Raleigh Parks | Raleighnc.gov.

Below are all of Durham’s Parks and Recreation events:

Fright Night Friday, October 156 p.m. – 9 p.m.Edison Johnson Recreation Center500 W Murray Avenue

Calling all of Durham’s ghosts and ghouls! DPR will host a fall event for all ages including classic carnival games, a costume parade, and for those who love a fright, a haunted house that will have you “howling” with screams and laughter! Come out in your favorite spooky attire!

BarktoberfestSaturday, October 233 p.m. – 6 p.m.Durham Central Park501 Foster Street

Barktoberfest is a celebration for our canine residents and their families. Join us for an afternoon of fun which will include a costume contest, games, a beer garden, pet-friendly organizations and vendors, food vendors, and more!

Trunk or TreatFriday, October 295:30 p.m.- 7:30 p.m.Holton Career and Resource Center401 N. Driver Street

Join the Holton staff for a fun filled family event celebrating fall! The event involves the open trunks of cars displaying candy, and decorations. Costumes not required but will make the event more exciting. Parents are encouraged to participate with their cars as well but not required.

Halloween Flashlight Scavenger HuntThis event is full. Residents can sign up to be placed on the waitlist.Friday, October 296 p.m. – 7 p.m.Whippoorwill Park1632 Rowemont Drive

Grab your flashlight, we’re going on a scavenger hunt! Bring your friends and family for spooky Halloween scavenger hunt. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Pre-registration is required.

HallowEnoSunday, October 31, 2021

6 p.m. - 9 p.m.

West Point on the Eno

5101 N Roxboro Street

Duke Wraps Up Fall Exhibitions with NC State

DURHAM – The Duke baseball team concluded its fall exhibition schedule on Friday with a 12-inning game against NC State at the Durham Bulls Athletic Park.Each team batted 10 players in the exhibition and the game was not officially scored, rather individual stats were kept."First off, what a great night," Duke head coach Chris Pollard said. "I would have never thought eight or 10 years ag...

DURHAM – The Duke baseball team concluded its fall exhibition schedule on Friday with a 12-inning game against NC State at the Durham Bulls Athletic Park.

Each team batted 10 players in the exhibition and the game was not officially scored, rather individual stats were kept.

"First off, what a great night," Duke head coach Chris Pollard said. "I would have never thought eight or 10 years ago that we would put this kind of crowd out in the DBAP on a fall night in October. It's a great testament to both programs, NC State and ours, that would get this type of atmosphere in a fall baseball game.

"I'm really excited about what I saw out of a lot of our guys. Just like last week against Davidson, we ran out all our young guys. A lot of those guys passed the test again, and some didn't but that is part of the learning process that happens in the fall. There were a lot of good things, this was a really good growing opportunity for us to have an ACC style atmosphere against a top-25 team, it is a really good litmus test."

Sophomore southpaw Luke Fox made his first exhibition appearance of the fall, starting on the bump for the Blue Devils. The Freshman All-American allowed one hit while striking out five in three scoreless innings.

.@lukefox85 picking up right where he left off. 3 IP | 0 R | 1 H | 5 K#BlueCollar | #GoDuke ?????? pic.twitter.com/b3FCwqskWR

— Duke Baseball (@DukeBASE) October 22, 2021

Freshmen Jonathan Santucci and Ryan Higgins each got time on the mound. Santucci, a left-hander out of Leominster, Mass., struck out two without allowing a hit in the seventh frame. Higgins allowed one run on one hit and a hit-by-pitch while striking out a pair in two innings of work.

In the box, sophomore Luke Storm led the way, going 2-for-3 with an RBI single in the fourth inning. Junior Graham Pauley launched a 376-foot home run in the third inning

Freshmen duo shortstop Alex Mooney and catcher Andrew Yu both started in the field and finished 1-for-2 with a run scored. Prior to pitching the seventh inning, Santucci started the game in left field and went 1-for-2 at the plate.

Rookie Tyler Christmas and senior Jake Topolski entered as defensive substitutes and made impacts at the plate. Christmas drove in a two-RBI double down the right field line in the 11th inning while Topolski finished 2-for-3 at the plate.

"I really was impressed with NC State's club," Pollard commented. "They did a good job reloading with some transfer players to be really good offensively again, they were a really good offense last year. I think they're going to be really good again this year."

Duke has a trio of three-game scrimmages remaining to close out the fall slate, capped off with its annual Fall World Series Nov. 11-13 at the Durham Bulls Athletic Park.

For more information on Duke baseball, follow the Blue Devils on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram by searching for "DukeBaseball".

#GoDuke

Durham votes 6-1 to raise mayor’s and council members’ pay. Here’s how much

The Durham City Council voted 6-1 Monday night to raise the pay for mayor and council members starting next year.The mayor’s salary will rise from $29,875 to $41,536, and the salary for council members will rise from $25,378 to $35,200 beginning Jan. 1, 2022.Council member Pierce Freelon, who is not seeking re-election, proposed the raises, saying bigger stipends would enable more people to run for public office.“The salary issue is one of many issues that converge to prevent folks from having the access to s...

The Durham City Council voted 6-1 Monday night to raise the pay for mayor and council members starting next year.

The mayor’s salary will rise from $29,875 to $41,536, and the salary for council members will rise from $25,378 to $35,200 beginning Jan. 1, 2022.

Council member Pierce Freelon, who is not seeking re-election, proposed the raises, saying bigger stipends would enable more people to run for public office.

“The salary issue is one of many issues that converge to prevent folks from having the access to serve,” he said.

Some Durham residents who spoke to the council Monday felt differently.

“At this time, during this pandemic, it seems like it is very insensitive to be pondering the increase of a stipend increase for City Council, “ said former Council member Jackie Wagstaff. “I don’t understand that logic.”

Wagstaff said people don’t run for office because of the money.

“Even if people can muster up the $200 to file, they will never gain because of the costs that it takes to run a campaign in Durham,” she said.

The News & Observer previously reported that some candidates in Durham’s current municipal election have raised more than $50,000 and have also spent just over $34,000, according to the latest campaign finance reports.

Mayor Steve Schewel and Council members Javiera Caballero, Freelon, Jillian Johnson, Mark-Anthony Middleton and Charlie Reece voted for the raises.

Council member DeDreana Freeman voted against the motion.

“In terms of its cost over the next 10 years, the budget for for City of Durham will be more like $6 billion, so this increase is a very small drop in a very large bucket,” said Schewel.

Although Freeman said she had been on the fence about the issue, she ultimately voted no because she felt it was not the right time during a global pandemic. The money could be better spent in other ways, she said.

Freeman in Ward 1 and Middleton in Ward 2 are the only current council members up for re-election.

Caballero, who recently suspended her campaign for mayor, will remain on the city council until at least 2023 when her current term ends.

Middleton said there will never be a good moment to raise the council’s salary and noted that Durham was dealing with poverty and gun violence before the pandemic.

But Middleton said the council should always aim to leave the governing body “in a better position than [we] found it,” and voted yes to help those in the future make a livable wage for work equivalent to a full-time job.

The N&O previously reported that the Raleigh City Council is debating raising their salaries as well. According to the report, council members would still be making less than their counterparts in Durham, Greensboro, Fayetteville and Winston-Salem.

This story was originally published October 19, 2021 11:44 AM.

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