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Restoration Experts of North Carolina

The Best Water Remediation in Holly Springs, NC

For most homeowners, the thought of dealing with water damage is about as attractive as going to the dentist for a root canal, if not worse. If the recent destruction caused by Hurricane Ida taught us anything, it’s that water damage can be catastrophic. The source of water damage can come from many different sources, including natural causes like rainstorms and internal property issues like pipe bursts. From plumbing problems to full-on floods, water damage in Holly Springs, NC, can weaken your home’s structure and even cause your family to fall ill. That’s why it is so important that you address water damage in your home as soon as possible.

At Restoration Experts of North Carolina, we understand that dealing with water damage can seem like a losing effort. With our team by your side, however, you don’t have to lose hope. We provide comprehensive water remediation in Holly Springs, from initial documentation of your damage to the time that we mitigate your problem. With a team of IICRC certified technicians and high-tech inspection tools, we have the experience and the innovation to restore your home or business to its original beauty.

The Best Water Remediation
Service Areas

With years of experience in the water damage restoration industry, there is no project too small or complex for our team to handle. Our customers are our top priority, and there are no exceptions to that rule.

At the end of the day, our clients choose Restoration Experts of North Carolina for three reasons:

Trustworthy Water Damage Mitigation Services

Trustworthy Water Damage Mitigation Services

Our goal is to restore your losses using mitigation techniques whenever possible to help restore your property to its original condition. If reconstruction is required, we will handle every aspect of your loss through a single, dependable point of contact.

Transparent Restoration with NoHidden Fees

Transparent Restoration with NoHidden Fees

At Restoration Experts of North Carolina, we make it a priority to provide our customers with comprehensive documentation and step-by-step status updates. Our transparent business model makes it easy for our customers to understand our water remediation progress. That way, you know exactly where we’re at with your project and have a permanent record of your home or businesses’ restoration. You won’t ever have to worry about hidden fees, unauthorized charges, or annoying efforts to sell you additional products or services.

Re-Defining Full-Service Water Clean-Up in Holly Springs

Re-Defining Full-Service Water Clean-Up in Holly Springs

Our goal is to be your one-stop source for water remediation in North Carolina. To help achieve this goal, we offer a wide range of additional services on top of our already stellar water damage restoration services. We combine our unmatched expertise with strategic partnerships to better serve our customers. We can provide all you need, from interior design consultations and decorating services to replacement furniture and appliances for your home or business. We are committed to giving our customers informative, effective, streamlined water remediation services in Holly Springs.

Common Signs of Water Damage in Holly Springs, NC

Water damage can happen to any structure, from large storefronts in town to suburban homes outside of the city. Incidents that cause water damage can happen at any time, making them particularly hard to remediate for non-professionals. To make matters worse, spotting signs of water damage isn’t as easy as you might think. Some signs are obvious, while others are subtle and even hidden. However, one of the best ways to address water damage in your home or business is to keep a sharp eye out for the following signs, so that you can treat the problem quickly and get back to normal life.

Signs of Water Damage Outside

Looking for signs outside is a great place to start, as it can narrow down external sources of water leaks. Keep an eye out for the following signs outside:

  • Windows and Door Frames: Check to see if there is any separation between your windows and door frames. Even small separations can lead to moisture leaking into your home or business, leading to mold growth.
  • Cracked or Missing Shingles: Severe rainstorms, tornadoes, and hurricanes are notorious for causing extensive water damage. Powerful natural disasters often strip residential and commercial roofs of shingles and flashing. When this happens, water can leak in through your roof and cause a litany of issues.
  • Ground Slope: Double check that your structure is sitting on the highest point on your property, with the ground sloping away from your home or business. If the ground slopes towards your home, you may be looking at water accumulation problems. When this happens, your foundation is at risk because water will accumulate on the sides of your structure. Eventually, this water can find its way inside.
Signs of Water Damage Inside

After you’re done checking for signs of water damage outside, it’s time to move indoors. Obviously, if you spot any of the following signs, your family could be at risk. It’s important to call Restoration Experts of North Carolina to schedule an inspection to determine the extent of your damage.

  • Sagging Spots on Floor: Sagging occurs around showers, sinks, and bathtubs. Also, check around appliances like dishwashers, water heaters, and washing machines.
  • Water Rings: Look for water rings on your ceilings and walls, as they can be signs of leaky pipes. It’s a good idea to check for water rings regularly, even if you don’t suspect any water damage.
  • Warped Tiles: Water damage to wood and laminate flooring will cause it to warp, bend, and split. Be sure to go out of your way to inspect areas that you might not think of checking, like corners of rooms you don’t go in often.
  • Musty Smell: If you suspect water damage is occurring, trust your sense of smell. If odors of must or mildew are present, you likely have water damage in some form.
  • Rust: Examine your water heater for signs of rust, which can indicate a current or past leak.
  • Watermarks: Check inside and under your cabinets, especially in your bathrooms and kitchen areas. If you see signs of discoloration and warping, you could have water damage in your home or business due to a leaking pipe.

Risks of Water Damage in Holly Springs, NC

If your home or business was recently flooded or you have had recent water damage, it is crucial to dry out your home or place of work ASAP. There are many risks associated with floods and leaks. One of the most common risks in situations like these is when water becomes contaminated. Contamination can happen when a sewer pipe bursts or a body of water floods into your home, like from a river or creek. Contaminated water often contains bacteria and microorganisms that can result in serious conditions like giardia. Even clean water can be a risk when stands for too long, since mosquitoes and other bugs breed in such conditions. Bugs that die in the water and critters that hatch eggs spread bacteria and attract even more bugs to the area.

After water recedes, the dampness left behind can cause fungus and mold growth – both of which can be detrimental to your health, especially if you have respiratory issues like asthma or have allergies.

Whether you have a small damp spot in your basement or severe flooding from a storm, do not take water damage lightly. Waiting to fix the issue will have a huge impact on your wallet, and more importantly, your family’s health.

Restoration Experts of North Carolina utilize the latest high-tech inspection tools like thermal imaging to discover the extent of your water damage. Using pumps, we extract the water and then use high-powered fans and heaters until your business or home is dry. While we’re drying your property, our team monitors and documents the entire process. We also specifically address any health hazards that can be associated with more severe categories of water damage.

If your property has flooded, you could be at risk from the following kinds of water leaks:
Clean Water
Clean Water

this water comes from broken or frozen pipes, failed water heaters, roof leaks, ice maker hoses, and more.

Grey Water
Grey Water

grey water is contaminated due to soiling like body oils, laundry soils, food stains, etc. This type of water often originates from dishwashers, washing machines, tub overflows, and hot tubs.

Black Water
Black Water

this type of water contains thousands of bacteria, protozoa, and disease-causing viruses. Black water most often comes from septic back-ups and overflows, sewer leaks, and toilet overflows.

What to Do When You Have Water Damage in Holly Springs, NC

When your property floods, the first step you should take is to call a qualified contractor to help facilitate your water clean-up in Holly Springs, NC. Restoration Experts of North Carolina has restored countless water losses and knows what needs to be done to get your home or business back to pre-loss condition. In situations like these, you must act fast to prevent damages and illnesses. Also, many home insurance policies require the homeowner to do everything in their power to protect the property from further damage. That’s where Restoration Experts of North Carolina comes in. We’ll bill your insurance company directly and will handle all the necessary water remediation work, so that you can focus on your family and your day-to-day responsibilities. Our team is on-call 24-hours a day and will be on our way to your home or business fast.

Since it'll take us a few minutes to arrive, consider the following pointers to help minimize property damage and speed up the restoration of your home:

  • If water has come from a contaminated source like your toilet, avoid all contact with the water.
  • If you do come into contact, clean yourself as soon as possible.
  • If safely accessible, turn off the source of water.
  • Turn off all power to the affected areas if circuit breakers are safe to access.
  • Remove we books, newspapers, rugs, and other such items. They will stain your home.
  • Blot pooling water with a mop or towels.
  • Remove water-sensitive items from wet areas. Prop them up in a dry, safe place.
  • Prevent additional damage to your furniture by placing plywood or foil underneath the legs.
  • Hang curtains and drapes that are wet in a dry room.
  • Avoid using fans or any electrical devices when standing on wet flooring.
  • Wait for professionals to dry your home or business. Do not use a standard vacuum cleaner, as water can damage these devices.
Steps to Take if You Have Sewage

Steps to Take if You Have Sewage or Black Water Damage

First things first – call Restoration Experts of North Carolina ASAP if you know for a fact that you have a black water leak. Black water contains disease-causing viruses and a plethora of bacteria that can be harmful to you or your children. If a sewage line leaks or your toilet overflows significantly, use our 24-hour emergency line, and our team will come to your location quickly. Until we arrive, take these steps to minimize black water damage in Holly Springs, NC.

  • Stay far away from areas affected by black water.
  • Plug all of your toilets with a string mop or wadded rags if you have had an overflow event.
  • Turn off your HVAC system. Cover exposed vents to prevent water from infiltrating your air ducts.
  • If the source of black water is coming from outside, be sure to turn off all water connections at their entry points.

Restoration Experts of North Carolina is Here for You

Whether your home was flooded from a hailstorm or you have an overflowing dishwasher, we are here to help. Our primary goal is to provide your family or customers with the most effective water remediation in Holly Springs, NC. That way, you can rest easy knowing you have a team of professionals on your side who are qualified and capable of full-serve water clean-up. Remember, if your home is affected by water damage, time is of the essence.

We’re only a call away from keeping your home or business dry and safe.
Contact us

Latest News in Holly Springs

Fujifilm is building a 2M square foot plant. Then it has to find workers to fill it

The property where Fujifilm Diosynth is building its planned $2 billion manufacturing facility in Holly Springs is so large you can barely see from one end to the other.But in just a few short years, that same view will be dominated by multiple football-field-sized buildings where new medicines and vaccines will be developed.It will be one of the largest construction projects in the state (around 2 million square feet of space), and will add 725 new jobs to Wake County in the next five years — a figure so coveted that sta...

The property where Fujifilm Diosynth is building its planned $2 billion manufacturing facility in Holly Springs is so large you can barely see from one end to the other.

But in just a few short years, that same view will be dominated by multiple football-field-sized buildings where new medicines and vaccines will be developed.

It will be one of the largest construction projects in the state (around 2 million square feet of space), and will add 725 new jobs to Wake County in the next five years — a figure so coveted that state and local governments offered more than $100 million in incentives to seal the deal.

But to fill all of those positions, Fujifilm will have to rely on a network of partners from the university level all the way down to the local school system.

“One of the reasons that we chose this location is because of all of the resources that are available,” Fujifilm Diosynth’s CEO Martin Meeson said in an interview.

“You’ve got the universities. You’ve got a community college network,” he said. “And one of the big commitments that the state and the region and those institutions are giving us is they’re going to keep bringing those candidates through.”

With North Carolina continuing to notch economic development wins in the past year, companies are making a bet that the Tar Heel State will continue to funnel talented workers in their direction.

N.C. State University Chancellor Randy Woodson said those expansions, while good, will provide a challenge to North Carolina’s institutions.

“We’re going to have to step up as a state,” Woodson said in an interview at Fujifilm Diosynth’s groundbreaking ceremony, noting the arrivals of both Google and Apple to the Triangle.

“We’re going to have to get back to the business of growing our enrollment in some of these high demand areas,” he said. “We’ve been working with the legislature on a plan to grow our computer science, biotechnology, genetic engineering, biopharmaceutical degree programs that feed into these growing industries.”

Talent, Woodson said, is the first thing every company asks about. “They want to make sure that they can attract and retain a high quality workforce,” he said. “And so we have a responsibility there.”

N.C. State has been a critical partner to Fujifilm Diosynth as it’s built up a presence in the Triangle over the last two decades.

The Japan-based company has partnered with N.C. State’s Biomanufacturing Training and Education Center (BTEC), an education center that teaches skills specific to pharmaceutical manufacturing. BTEC has trained more than 200 people in Fujifilm Diosynth’s existing workforce. The company has around 600 workers at facilities in Research Triangle Park.

Growing programs, like BTEC, Woodson said, will be critical in the coming years, as highly technical jobs continue to open in the state.

Companies “want to know there are opportunities for them and the university to work collaboratively,” Woodson said.

Meeson said Fujifilm is looking for employees from a wide variety of backgrounds, not just people who have worked in biotechnology before. The company has a robust training program, and has filled many of its jobs with people who are switching careers during the pandemic. Meeson noted it has many roles in logistics, supply chain, facilities management and computer programming.

“Don’t think your skill set might have narrowed you out of where we actually operate,” Meeson said. “We have an extremely broad pool of candidates coming out of other industries and the university system.”

This story was produced with financial support from a coalition of partners led by Innovate Raleigh as part of an independent journalism fellowship program. The N&O maintains full editorial control of the work. Learn more; go to bit.ly/newsinnovate

This story was originally published October 15, 2021 5:45 AM.

Easing of coronavirus pandemic clears way for opening of Rex Holly Springs hospital

After a delay of several weeks brought on by the coronavirus pandemic, UNC Rex Holly Springs hospital will open on Nov. 1.UNC Health made the announcement Tuesday morning, citing a decline in COVID-19 cases at the main Rex hospital in Raleigh.Rex had planned to open the Holly Springs hospital in September. But with its main hospital struggling to keep up with the late summer surge in COVID-19 cases, Rex leaders decided to...

After a delay of several weeks brought on by the coronavirus pandemic, UNC Rex Holly Springs hospital will open on Nov. 1.

UNC Health made the announcement Tuesday morning, citing a decline in COVID-19 cases at the main Rex hospital in Raleigh.

Rex had planned to open the Holly Springs hospital in September. But with its main hospital struggling to keep up with the late summer surge in COVID-19 cases, Rex leaders decided to focus their staff there.

The number of COVID-19 patients at Rex peaked in late August at 67, said Dr. Linda Butler, the chief medical officer. It declined a bit in September, but the number needing intensive care didn’t crest until Sept. 21, at 26.

On Monday, Rex was down to 34 COVID-19 patients, Butler said, mirroring a decline in coronavirus hospitalizations statewide.

The waning of the coronavirus outbreak means UNC can begin to shift some of its staff from Raleigh to the Holly Springs hospital. When it opens at the corner of N.C. 55 and Avent Ferry Road, Rex Holly Springs will have 300 employees, about 40% of them transfers from Rex in Raleigh.

The Holly Springs hospital will eventually employ more than 400 people. It will have 50 inpatient beds, a 24-bed emergency department, operating rooms and a maternity center with seven labor and delivery rooms and an operating suite for C-sections.

UNC Rex first proposed building a hospital in Holly Springs in 2011. Novant Health, based in Winston-Salem, had proposed building a hospital in town in 2008 and again in 2011 but was turned down both times by state regulators.

But regulators approved the UNC Rex proposal in 2012, over objections from Novant and WakeMed. Novant filed an appeal in court, but dropped its legal fight in 2014 after two decisions in Rex’s favor.

Construction on the eight-story hospital didn’t get started until 2019, as Rex and UNC focused on building a heart and vascular center in Raleigh.

All three of the Triangle’s big health care systems are jockeying to serve patients in fast-growing western Wake County. WakeMed received permission from state regulators to add 30 acute care beds to its hospital in Cary, bringing the total there to 208.

Meanwhile, Duke Health plans to build a 40-bed hospital on Green Level West Road in western Cary. Construction of Duke Green Level Hospital is expected to begin in April 2023 and be complete by the summer of 2026.

This story was originally published October 19, 2021 7:11 AM.

$2B Fujifilm Diosynth Biotechnologies plant moves closer to reality in Holly Springs

HOLLY SPRINGS – Fujifilm Diosynth Biotechnologies is moving full speed ahead with its new $2 billion facility in Holly Springs, which the company has said will be the largest end-to-end biologics production facility globally upon its completion.The investment involves constructing the facility in Holly Springs, and to staff the new plant, the comp...

HOLLY SPRINGS – Fujifilm Diosynth Biotechnologies is moving full speed ahead with its new $2 billion facility in Holly Springs, which the company has said will be the largest end-to-end biologics production facility globally upon its completion.

The investment involves constructing the facility in Holly Springs, and to staff the new plant, the company will hire 725 positions that pay an average salary of just under $100,000, it said. A formal groundbreaking ceremony took place Thursday.

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“Today we celebrated a significant milestone of bringing this new site closer to reality, thanks to the hard work and dedication of our partners, and our current employees. We are now looking into the future as we build a facility that will further allow us to fulfill Fujifilm Diosynth Biotechnologies’ core purpose to produce life-impacting medicines in partnership with our customers,” Chief Executive Martin Meeson said at the event. “With the strong embrace of our public and private partners in North Carolina, we are excited to add 725 new members to our team over the next several years. We will be doing all of this in a facility that is designed and built with sustainability as its core in alignment with Fujifilm’s Sustainable Value Plan 2030*.”

Meeson said Holly Springs was picked for the plant, which is expected to open in 2025, because the town, and all of North Carolina, for that matter, have been “purposeful” in creating a foundation to support the biotechnology industry.

WRAL TechWire spoke with company representatives ahead of the groundbreaking. Our interview, lightly edited for clarity, appears below.

Fujifilm Diosynth Biotechnologies has picked the Triangle for a huge new drug product manufacturing facility and the creation of hundreds of jobs paying average salaries of more than $95,000.

TW: The company currently employs 1,220 in the United States – where are these current employees based at this time? Is the company bringing other existing employees to the new facility – how many – how soon?

Fujifilm Diosynth Biotechnologies operates facilities in in RTP, North Carolina, and College Station, Texas. The new facility will bring 725 jobs new jobs. We may bring employees from other Fujifilm Diosynth Biotechnologies sites to Holly Springs based on project needs. This is still being defined.

Our investment represents true collaboration and partnership at the local and state level, and we are confident that the new facility will create a high quality of life for all residents in Holly Springs.

TW: What’s the total value of the economic incentive package received by the state of North Carolina?

The Fujifilm Diosynth Biotechnologies’ project in North Carolina will be facilitated, in part, by a Job Development Investment Grant approved by the state’s Economic Investment Committee.

Over the course of the 12-year term of this grant, the project is estimated to grow the state’s economy by $5.5 billion. Using a formula that takes into account the new tax revenues generated by the new jobs, the JDIG agreement authorizes the potential reimbursement to the company of up to $19,724,250, spread over 12 years, based on a required capital investment of $1.5 billion.

TW: Why the location was selected, and where else geographically was considered?

We considered several locations across the country during the site selection process. Fujifilm Diosynth Biotechnologies selected Holly Springs for its strong pool of technical talent, local resources and partners with the right competencies, clean energy resources and sustainability for future growth.

Holly Springs researched the needs of life science companies and took that knowledge to create the highest-ranked industrial site in Wake County through strategic investments in water, sewer, and road infrastructure. Holly Springs has developed one of the most robust reclaimed water systems in the state, which not only saves businesses money, but enables them to incorporate environmentally sustainable practices into daily operations.

The new site is also strategically important to accelerate the growth of Fujifilm’s biopharma contract development and manufacturing business. With an existing facility in Morrisville, North Carolina, Fujifilm Diosynth Biotechnologies is committed to continuing our strong collaboration with state and local officials, which we have cultivated over the years. We look forward to making significant contributions to North Carolina’s biotech region for generations to come.

TW: What’s the state of the talent market in the Triangle. How do you plan to recruit, train, and/or prepare people for these roles and for careers in the industry?

Fujifilm Diosynth Biotechnologies values the strong relationships we have developed and cultivated over the years with academic and university partners in North Carolina including N.C. State, Wake Technical Community College, the North Carolina Community College System, UNC-Chapel Hill, Duke University and North Carolina Central University.

Wake Technical Community College will take the lead on training new employees at our Holly Springs facility. Wake Tech has also offered temporary space at its Morrisville campus to help conduct hiring and training. N.C. State will provide customized workforce training at its Biomanufacturing Training and Education Center, in addition to other workforce development partnerships.

We appreciate their tremendous support and rely on our university research partners to build a highly skilled pool of talent-ready individuals who can immediately contribute their expertise to the life sciences industry.

We also recognize that collaboration is key to our collective success. We look forward to continuing to work with our academic partners to identify opportunities to expand the candidate pool and improve workforce readiness to meet the ever-increasing demand for biopharma manufacturing talent.

TW: What else is important to note about the facility, about these jobs, that we haven’t discussed at this time?

This is the largest life sciences investment ever made in North Carolina and further positions Holly Springs, Wake County and Research Triangle Park as a world-class location for biotech companies.

We are pleased that sustainability will be at the core of the facility, which targets 100% clean energy utilization, cutting-edge waste disposal and recycling.

There has never been a more exciting or promising time for the life sciences. This last year and a half has shown us the power of what’s possible when the private and public sector join together to solve big problems.

Once the facility is operational in 2025, Fujifilm Diosynth Biotechnologies will develop, produce, package and ship the next-generation therapeutics.

Video: Wake Economic Development execs discuss reasons for boom in projects

Adrienne Cole, CEO of the greater Raleigh Chamber of Commerce, talks with Wake Economic Development’s Michael Haley and Ashley Cagle about recent announcements from Fujifilm Diosynth Biotechnologies and Google in this YouTube interview.

WRAL TechWire

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Holly Springs parents push back on Wake school reassignment proposal

Cary, N.C. — Some Wake County parents are speaking out against a proposed plan to reassign students in select schools for the 2022-23 school year.Most of the outrage is coming from families living in the Stonemont community in Holly Springs. The new plan...

Cary, N.C. — Some Wake County parents are speaking out against a proposed plan to reassign students in select schools for the 2022-23 school year.

Most of the outrage is coming from families living in the Stonemont community in Holly Springs. The new plan would send students in the neighborhood to Fuquay-Varina High School, which is about a 20-minute drive.

Parents have launched a petition in hopes that revisions are made to the proposal.

"It doesn't make much sense to me why they would single out this neighborhood to make that decision," said Lewis Jackson.

Jackson said he was drawn to Holly Springs based on how close the schools were to his home.

"When you look at the distance that this neighborhood is to the high school, it's about 1.4 miles," said Jackson. "It's very easy to get to."

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Hundreds of Wake students could face school reassignment

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The proposed plan from the Wake County Public School System would reassign Jackson's child and other high school students from Holly Springs High School to Fuquay-Varina High School.

"To me, there's a danger involved with that, in regards to new kids learning how to drive and going to high school ... being in a rush to go to school because they're running late or get to events," said Jackson.

Parent Son Ly said the proposal singles out the Stonemont community.

"It's not an ideal situation," said Ly. "Other neighborhoods much closer to Fuquay-Varina have much larger households that would have an impact in terms of overcrowding."

Census data shows Holly Springs’ population grew from 9,192 in 2000 to nearly 42,000 people in 2021, and Fuquay-Varina’s population grew by more than 335 percent, to more than 34,388 people.

"While we strive to assign students to the most proximate school to their address, it is not always possible. This is only the first draft of the enrollment process," a school district spokeswoman said in a statement.

"I would like to stay within at least a 1- or 2-mile radius for all kids. I know it's not possible in every case, but if I had my choice, that's what it would be," said Jackson. "I know it's not an easy decision when you have this many people. It's growing like crazy."

The school district will present a second draft basked on feedback to the school board on Nov. 16

Parents are able to leave feedback about the school reassignments in an online forum. The district will receive and respond to feedback online before the board adopts a final enrollment plan for the 2022-23 school year.

A public hearing about the draft will be held during a school board meeting on Nov. 30. The board is expected to vote on the final plan on Dec. 7.

Biz: NC's fall colors equal tourism boom for Asheville; Fenton in Cary lands another key retailer

As leaves change across the North Carolina mountains, the Asheville area is seeing a surge of tourism — and trends from the pandemic that may last.Hotel occupancy for September was 75 percent, according to figures from Victoria Isley, president and CEO of the Explore Asheville Convention and Visitors Bureau. That’s well above the 60 percent from September 2020 and even higher than the 73 percent from September 2019.But what’s interesting is that rise isn’t coming at the expense of vacation rentals. In fa...

As leaves change across the North Carolina mountains, the Asheville area is seeing a surge of tourism — and trends from the pandemic that may last.

Hotel occupancy for September was 75 percent, according to figures from Victoria Isley, president and CEO of the Explore Asheville Convention and Visitors Bureau. That’s well above the 60 percent from September 2020 and even higher than the 73 percent from September 2019.

But what’s interesting is that rise isn’t coming at the expense of vacation rentals. In fact, vacation rentals for August were at 70 percent of capacity, down slightly from 74 percent last August but well above the 64 percent from 2019.

“In fact, both segments have continued to grow,” Isley says, noting that the length of stays is growing as well.

As in other markets, restaurants and the hospitality industry have struggled to staff the demand. “Our restaurants continue to struggle somewhat with the workforce,” Isley says, noting that many are limiting hours because of lack of workers.

But the trend from the pandemic of longer trips as people take their laptops and work from anywhere is expected to continue, especially in destinations such as Asheville.

Lululemon plans store in new Cary development

The Fenton development in Cary has landed another key retailer: Lululemon Athletica.

The Canadian athletic apparel company has filed plans to bring a new retail location to the project, with around 3,600 square feet of space at 20 Fenton Main St., Suite 170.

Fenton is on target to open its first phase in April. The Lululemon opening is uncertain.

Other retailers heading to Fenton are Williams-Sonoma, Pottery Barn, Athleta and Von Kekel Aveda Lifestyle Salon Spa.

On the restaurant and dining side, businesses will include Scott Crawford’s Crawford Brothers Steakhouse, Steve Palmer’s Italian restaurant Colletta, Michael Lee’s M Sushi, Ford Fry’s Tex-Mex restaurant Superica and whiskey bar Dram & Draught, owned by Drew Schenck and Kevin Barrett.

New hospital opening in Holly Springs

A new hospital is set to open in fast-growing Holly Springs after being delayed because of the pandemic.

UNC Rex had planned to open the hospital in September, but delayed that to focus on the surge of Covid-19 patients. Now, the new Holly Springs Hospital will open Nov. 1 at 7 a.m. The 8-story facility will include 50 inpatient beds and a full-service emergency room. It will employ 300 people at first and eventually more than 400.

“We are excited to open our new hospital and begin caring for patients in Southwestern Wake County and beyond,” says Roy Tempke, chief operating officer of the hospital. “We appreciate all the community support during these challenging times and look forward to providing excellent medical care at this hospital for generations to come."

Did you know this about the Orange County market?

The dynamic growth in Orange County is evident in a fascinating data dive provided by the area’s business booster group.

Since 2017, commercial property in the county has risen 62 percent in value, outpacing the 34 percent for residential. But the value of apartments has risen even more, by 73 percent.

But life in Chapel Hill is expensive. According to the report, the average residential property tax bill is $7,549. By comparison, Cary is $4,327 and Raleigh is $3,349.

Two other bits of information jump out as well. One is on obesity – the document details information from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation detailing that 32 percent of North Carolina adults are obese. In Orange County, that number is 22 percent, compared to 28 percent in both Wake and Durham counties.

Also, people in Orange County are less likely to smoke. The report notes that 18 percent of North Carolina adults smoke, compared to 15 percent in Orange County. Durham County also had a 15 percent rate, with Wake County checking in at 14 percent.

Longfellow makes a big move – to the United Kingdom

A company that’s rapidly building its presence in the Triangle is launching its first international expansion.

Longfellow Real Estate Partners is planting its flag in the United Kingdom, the company announced recently, naming a London-based managing director for the U.K.

“Longfellow is set to expand internationally, building off the successful track record in creating vibrant life science clusters and developments throughout the United States,” the company said.

Longfellow is behind some big projects in the region, including Durham.ID and the massive Hub RTP project, where Longfellow will develop a 220,000-square-foot office tower. The company is heavily focused on the life sciences space.

New restaurant to open in downtown Chapel Hill

One of the busiest sections of downtown Chapel Hill is getting a new authentic Himalayan restaurant.

Momo’s Master is set to open at 110 N. Columbia St. near West Franklin Street in November, said owner Ramesh Dahal. The restaurant will feature various kinds of made-to-order momos, a type of dumpling that is popular in places such as Tibet and Nepal, where Dahal was born and raised.

Businesses near the highly visible intersection of North Columbia and West Franklin streets have not lasted long due to high rents, but Dahal said Momo’s Master will have what it takes to survive. He has over 20 years of experience as a chef, including working at the Angus Barn in Raleigh and La Farm Bakery in Cary.

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