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Restoration Experts of North Carolina

The Best Water Remediation in Raleigh, NC

For most homeowners, the thought of dealing with water damage is about as attractive as going to the dentist for a root canal, if not worse. If the recent destruction caused by Hurricane Ida taught us anything, it’s that water damage can be catastrophic. The source of water damage can come from many different sources, including natural causes like rainstorms and internal property issues like pipe bursts. From plumbing problems to full-on floods, water damage in Raleigh, NC, can weaken your home’s structure and even cause your family to fall ill. That’s why it is so important that you address water damage in your home as soon as possible.

At Restoration Experts of North Carolina, we understand that dealing with water damage can seem like a losing effort. With our team by your side, however, you don’t have to lose hope. We provide comprehensive water remediation in Raleigh, from initial documentation of your damage to the time that we mitigate your problem. With a team of IICRC certified technicians and high-tech inspection tools, we have the experience and the innovation to restore your home or business to its original beauty.

The Best Water Remediation
Service Areas

With years of experience in the water damage restoration industry, there is no project too small or complex for our team to handle. Our customers are our top priority, and there are no exceptions to that rule.

At the end of the day, our clients choose Restoration Experts of North Carolina for three reasons:

Trustworthy Water Damage Mitigation Services

Trustworthy Water Damage Mitigation Services

Our goal is to restore your losses using mitigation techniques whenever possible to help restore your property to its original condition. If reconstruction is required, we will handle every aspect of your loss through a single, dependable point of contact.

Transparent Restoration with NoHidden Fees

Transparent Restoration with NoHidden Fees

At Restoration Experts of North Carolina, we make it a priority to provide our customers with comprehensive documentation and step-by-step status updates. Our transparent business model makes it easy for our customers to understand our water remediation progress. That way, you know exactly where we’re at with your project and have a permanent record of your home or businesses’ restoration. You won’t ever have to worry about hidden fees, unauthorized charges, or annoying efforts to sell you additional products or services.

Re-Defining Full-Service Water Clean-Up in Raleigh

Re-Defining Full-Service Water Clean-Up in Raleigh

Our goal is to be your one-stop source for water remediation in North Carolina. To help achieve this goal, we offer a wide range of additional services on top of our already stellar water damage restoration services. We combine our unmatched expertise with strategic partnerships to better serve our customers. We can provide all you need, from interior design consultations and decorating services to replacement furniture and appliances for your home or business. We are committed to giving our customers informative, effective, streamlined water remediation services in Raleigh.

Common Signs of Water Damage in Raleigh, NC

Water damage can happen to any structure, from large storefronts in town to suburban homes outside of the city. Incidents that cause water damage can happen at any time, making them particularly hard to remediate for non-professionals. To make matters worse, spotting signs of water damage isn’t as easy as you might think. Some signs are obvious, while others are subtle and even hidden. However, one of the best ways to address water damage in your home or business is to keep a sharp eye out for the following signs, so that you can treat the problem quickly and get back to normal life.

Signs of Water Damage Outside

Looking for signs outside is a great place to start, as it can narrow down external sources of water leaks. Keep an eye out for the following signs outside:

  • Windows and Door Frames: Check to see if there is any separation between your windows and door frames. Even small separations can lead to moisture leaking into your home or business, leading to mold growth.
  • Cracked or Missing Shingles: Severe rainstorms, tornadoes, and hurricanes are notorious for causing extensive water damage. Powerful natural disasters often strip residential and commercial roofs of shingles and flashing. When this happens, water can leak in through your roof and cause a litany of issues.
  • Ground Slope: Double check that your structure is sitting on the highest point on your property, with the ground sloping away from your home or business. If the ground slopes towards your home, you may be looking at water accumulation problems. When this happens, your foundation is at risk because water will accumulate on the sides of your structure. Eventually, this water can find its way inside.
Signs of Water Damage Inside

After you’re done checking for signs of water damage outside, it’s time to move indoors. Obviously, if you spot any of the following signs, your family could be at risk. It’s important to call Restoration Experts of North Carolina to schedule an inspection to determine the extent of your damage.

  • Sagging Spots on Floor: Sagging occurs around showers, sinks, and bathtubs. Also, check around appliances like dishwashers, water heaters, and washing machines.
  • Water Rings: Look for water rings on your ceilings and walls, as they can be signs of leaky pipes. It’s a good idea to check for water rings regularly, even if you don’t suspect any water damage.
  • Warped Tiles: Water damage to wood and laminate flooring will cause it to warp, bend, and split. Be sure to go out of your way to inspect areas that you might not think of checking, like corners of rooms you don’t go in often.
  • Musty Smell: If you suspect water damage is occurring, trust your sense of smell. If odors of must or mildew are present, you likely have water damage in some form.
  • Rust: Examine your water heater for signs of rust, which can indicate a current or past leak.
  • Watermarks: Check inside and under your cabinets, especially in your bathrooms and kitchen areas. If you see signs of discoloration and warping, you could have water damage in your home or business due to a leaking pipe.

Risks of Water Damage in Raleigh, NC

If your home or business was recently flooded or you have had recent water damage, it is crucial to dry out your home or place of work ASAP. There are many risks associated with floods and leaks. One of the most common risks in situations like these is when water becomes contaminated. Contamination can happen when a sewer pipe bursts or a body of water floods into your home, like from a river or creek. Contaminated water often contains bacteria and microorganisms that can result in serious conditions like giardia. Even clean water can be a risk when stands for too long, since mosquitoes and other bugs breed in such conditions. Bugs that die in the water and critters that hatch eggs spread bacteria and attract even more bugs to the area.

After water recedes, the dampness left behind can cause fungus and mold growth – both of which can be detrimental to your health, especially if you have respiratory issues like asthma or have allergies.

Whether you have a small damp spot in your basement or severe flooding from a storm, do not take water damage lightly. Waiting to fix the issue will have a huge impact on your wallet, and more importantly, your family’s health.

Restoration Experts of North Carolina utilize the latest high-tech inspection tools like thermal imaging to discover the extent of your water damage. Using pumps, we extract the water and then use high-powered fans and heaters until your business or home is dry. While we’re drying your property, our team monitors and documents the entire process. We also specifically address any health hazards that can be associated with more severe categories of water damage.

If your property has flooded, you could be at risk from the following kinds of water leaks:
Clean Water
Clean Water

this water comes from broken or frozen pipes, failed water heaters, roof leaks, ice maker hoses, and more.

Grey Water
Grey Water

grey water is contaminated due to soiling like body oils, laundry soils, food stains, etc. This type of water often originates from dishwashers, washing machines, tub overflows, and hot tubs.

Black Water
Black Water

this type of water contains thousands of bacteria, protozoa, and disease-causing viruses. Black water most often comes from septic back-ups and overflows, sewer leaks, and toilet overflows.

What to Do When You Have Water Damage in Raleigh, NC

When your property floods, the first step you should take is to call a qualified contractor to help facilitate your water clean-up in Raleigh, NC. Restoration Experts of North Carolina has restored countless water losses and knows what needs to be done to get your home or business back to pre-loss condition. In situations like these, you must act fast to prevent damages and illnesses. Also, many home insurance policies require the homeowner to do everything in their power to protect the property from further damage. That’s where Restoration Experts of North Carolina comes in. We’ll bill your insurance company directly and will handle all the necessary water remediation work, so that you can focus on your family and your day-to-day responsibilities. Our team is on-call 24-hours a day and will be on our way to your home or business fast.

Since it'll take us a few minutes to arrive, consider the following pointers to help minimize property damage and speed up the restoration of your home:

  • If water has come from a contaminated source like your toilet, avoid all contact with the water.
  • If you do come into contact, clean yourself as soon as possible.
  • If safely accessible, turn off the source of water.
  • Turn off all power to the affected areas if circuit breakers are safe to access.
  • Remove we books, newspapers, rugs, and other such items. They will stain your home.
  • Blot pooling water with a mop or towels.
  • Remove water-sensitive items from wet areas. Prop them up in a dry, safe place.
  • Prevent additional damage to your furniture by placing plywood or foil underneath the legs.
  • Hang curtains and drapes that are wet in a dry room.
  • Avoid using fans or any electrical devices when standing on wet flooring.
  • Wait for professionals to dry your home or business. Do not use a standard vacuum cleaner, as water can damage these devices.
Steps to Take if You Have Sewage

Steps to Take if You Have Sewage or Black Water Damage

First things first – call Restoration Experts of North Carolina ASAP if you know for a fact that you have a black water leak. Black water contains disease-causing viruses and a plethora of bacteria that can be harmful to you or your children. If a sewage line leaks or your toilet overflows significantly, use our 24-hour emergency line, and our team will come to your location quickly. Until we arrive, take these steps to minimize black water damage in Raleigh, NC.

  • Stay far away from areas affected by black water.
  • Plug all of your toilets with a string mop or wadded rags if you have had an overflow event.
  • Turn off your HVAC system. Cover exposed vents to prevent water from infiltrating your air ducts.
  • If the source of black water is coming from outside, be sure to turn off all water connections at their entry points.

Restoration Experts of North Carolina is Here for You

Whether your home was flooded from a hailstorm or you have an overflowing dishwasher, we are here to help. Our primary goal is to provide your family or customers with the most effective water remediation in Raleigh, NC. That way, you can rest easy knowing you have a team of professionals on your side who are qualified and capable of full-serve water clean-up. Remember, if your home is affected by water damage, time is of the essence.

We’re only a call away from keeping your home or business dry and safe.
Contact us

Latest News in Raleigh

No more rentals: HOA ruling to force 180 families from Raleigh neighborhood

RALEIGH, N.C. (WNCN) – About 180 families who rent homes in a Raleigh neighborhood may soon be forced to uproot their lives and move out because of a ruling by the homeowners association.Mark Scearce is one of them.“I absolutely love it here. I love the whole design of the place,” Scearce said of renting at Renaissance Park. “It’s very walkable. Very friendly folks around. It’s just an ideal place to live.”The Renaissance Park Homeowners Association Board of Directors plans to en...

RALEIGH, N.C. (WNCN) – About 180 families who rent homes in a Raleigh neighborhood may soon be forced to uproot their lives and move out because of a ruling by the homeowners association.

Mark Scearce is one of them.

“I absolutely love it here. I love the whole design of the place,” Scearce said of renting at Renaissance Park. “It’s very walkable. Very friendly folks around. It’s just an ideal place to live.”

The Renaissance Park Homeowners Association Board of Directors plans to enforce a policy that requires renters to vacate the south Raleigh community by July 1, 2022.

“I’m close to retirement,” Scearce said. “I teach at N.C. State and I would love to remain here for as long as I’m allowed to.”

Renaissance Park has had a limited no-rental policy, or “covenant,” since the community was built in 2006, but the developer didn’t enforce it. When the developer transferred power to the newly created HOA Board of Directors earlier this year, the seven-member board decided to change that.

The Renaissance Park Master Association Board of Directors sent CBS 17 this statement:

“The goal of this Board is to enforce the covenants of the community in a fair and equitable manner for all members, and to create reasonable expectation with a focus on long-term property value. In respect to the recent question of rental property within the neighborhood we would like to address some of the recent questions. The covenants were not created by this current Board but were established and registered with Wake County by Wakefield Development in 2006. All homeowners are provided a copy of these covenants at the time of closing on their property.”

Residents told CBS 17 they were blindsided. Some have rented at Renaissance Park for almost 10 years. Others have multiple homes and rent to family members.

Alex Brown and his wife own a home at Renaissance Park. Brown said the impact of restricting rentals will be widespread.

“The overall assessment of this neighborhood is we do not feel like this is required,” Brown said. “Why was this the first action of business that was taken upon? We have several other items that deserve attention versus going out and trying to essentially kick out 200 families, not to mention the possible fire sale of properties from that.”

The Board is allowing homeowners to request what it calls “narrow exceptions” based on personal hardships. Board President Ron Boyd said members will meet in November to decide what that includes. As of Wednesday, the board has granted one exception to a member of the military.

“It’s all subjective,” Brown said. “There’s no transparency. There’s no rubric for what is allowed, what is denied.

“If I want to rent, I have to essentially be on my knees and beg, ‘Please let me go take care of my parents.’”

Homeowners who aren’t granted an exception and choose to rent their home after July 1, 2022, will be told to either move back in or sell their property. Homeowners who violate the policy will be fined $100 a day.

“It’s a little disconcerting to have to think about uprooting and leaving when I found a place that’s, like, a fantastic place to be,” Scearce said. “So, I’m hoping they can resolve this.”

CBS 17 reached out to the City of Raleigh about its stance on restrictive rental properties considering the lack of affordable housing, but a spokesperson said they don’t comment on private organizations.

Amedeo’s, a shrine to NC State fandom and Italian food, mourns passing of its namesake

Amedeo “Dick” DeAngelis, whose Italian restaurant Amedeo’s serves as a Raleigh shrine to N.C. State athletics, died Wednesday. He was 85.DeAngelis was a former all-ACC football player, starring on the Wolfpack’s first ACC Championship team in 1957.But his legacy is the Italian restaurant bearing his name on Western Boulevard in Raleigh, which has stood as one of the city’s centers of N.C. State fandom for decades.DeAngelis returned to Raleigh from his hometown of Reading, Pennsylvania, after...

Amedeo “Dick” DeAngelis, whose Italian restaurant Amedeo’s serves as a Raleigh shrine to N.C. State athletics, died Wednesday. He was 85.

DeAngelis was a former all-ACC football player, starring on the Wolfpack’s first ACC Championship team in 1957.

But his legacy is the Italian restaurant bearing his name on Western Boulevard in Raleigh, which has stood as one of the city’s centers of N.C. State fandom for decades.

DeAngelis returned to Raleigh from his hometown of Reading, Pennsylvania, after his playing days and opened Amedeo’s Italian Restaurant in 1963 with his wife, Betty DeAngelis. His son-in-law, Dave Parker, who curates the restaurant’s countless pieces of Wolfpack memorabilia, said DeAngelis knew there was a need for authentic Italian-American food in Raleigh.

“I heard him say many times, ‘Before Amedeo’s, Italian food in Raleigh was ketchup on white bread,’” Parker said. “His personality was infectious; everyone loved him.”

DeAngelis’ death was announced on social media by the restaurant he co-founded with his brother.

“Our founder, Amedeo “Dick” DeAngelis peacefully passed away this morning after several years of declining health,” Amedeo’s said on Twitter. “There aren’t enough characters on Twitter to express how much he will missed.”

Amedeo’s is now owned by David Harris, Rodney Byrd and DeAngelis’ daughter and son-in-law, Jill and Dave Parker.

DeAngelis came to N.C. State on a football scholarship in 1953, the year the Atlantic Coast Conference was founded, playing most of his years under coach Earle Edwards.

“He’d say he was a tackle both ways,” Parker said. “If they didn’t get a first down, he’d run down under the punt and then play defense.”

After coaching high school football for a few years after graduation, DeAngelis and his wife moved to Raleigh to open the restaurant.

The red and white checkered tablecloths at Amedeo’s would look at home in any Italian-American restaurant. But make no mistake, these colors are for N.C. State.

Amedeo’s was a major presence for Wolfpack athletics, former N.C. State basketball player Lou Pucillo said. It drew former athletes, current coaches, alums in town for a game and generations of Wolfpack stars to dine on plates of lasagna and Italian sandwiches.

Pucillo recalled sitting at a table once with a large group, including DeAngelis and then N.C. State basketball coach Jim Valvano in the days after Wolfpack star Dereck Whittenburg had broken a bone in a foot and looked to doom the team’s 1983 season.

“We were all crying in our beer of course,” Pucillo said. “And the schedule is hanging up in Amedeo’s, and we’re all counting likely wins and losses. I say ‘I think a 16-14 record is not too bad. Valvano said he thought they could do better than that and boy was he right.”

That “Cardiac Pack” team would win the 1983 NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament.

Beyond the Wolfpack personalities, Amedeo’s was filled with the relics and treasure of N.C. State triumphs.

For more than a decade, the two N.C. State basketball national championship banners hung on the ceiling, before eventually making their way back to a renovated Reynolds Coliseum in 2017. There are decades of football bowl game banners hanging down from the Amedeo’s rafters, hundreds of black and white photos on the wall, framed jerseys and booths in the dining room named after Wolfpack greats, including Valvano and Pucillo.

“Amedeo’s is a staple for N.C. State fans,” said former Wolfpack Club executive director Bobby Purcell. “A lot of Wolfpackers eat dinner there, it’s kind of a museum for Wolfpack athletics.

“And the food is good. But a lot of it is being around (DeAngelis), being around him was always a lot of fun. He was a wonderful human being, always jovial, always welcoming.”

This story was originally published October 20, 2021 6:29 PM.

NC State Fair attendance starts slow, but fairgoers welcome ‘small sense of normalcy’

In its first five days, the North Carolina State Fair has seen attendance drop by more than 60,000 people from the last fair two years ago.It’s a decline that some expected as the continuing COVID-19 pandemic thins out crowds, officials say.But those on hand in Raleigh report a happy if partial return to social life. They’re calling the Raleigh fair a success so far in spite of lower totals.In 2020, COVI...

In its first five days, the North Carolina State Fair has seen attendance drop by more than 60,000 people from the last fair two years ago.

It’s a decline that some expected as the continuing COVID-19 pandemic thins out crowds, officials say.

But those on hand in Raleigh report a happy if partial return to social life. They’re calling the Raleigh fair a success so far in spite of lower totals.

In 2020, COVID-19 canceled the Raleigh fair for the first time since World War II, costing millions in lost revenue for the self-supporting fairgrounds.

The North Carolina State Fair will be held this October for the first time in two years. That means wild new fair foods, including cornbread funnel cakes, lobster on a stick, stuffed turkey legs and deep fried cookie dough. Take a look. By Kevin Keister

The total from the fair’s opening day last Thursday through Monday reached 318,014 people through the gates — 63,046 fewer than in 2019. And while fair crowds just topped 27,000 on opening Thursday, the lowest on record for that day, by Sunday they pushed to 93,182 — far more than the same day two years ago.

“Certainly, it’s a hard year to know what to expect, and we are very satisfied with what we’re seeing,” said Kent Yelverton, fair manager. “We’ve had over a quarter of a million people come to the State Fair and that’s exciting. It’s an NC State Fair just like it’s supposed to be.”

Other fairs nationwide took strict measures to curb the pandemic’s spread, requiring masks in Washington and vaccine cards in New Mexico.

While North Carolina did not mandate either precaution, it strongly encouraged fair-goers on both counts. So far, Wake County has vaccinated about 90 fair-goers, said spokeswoman Stacy Beard, and expects to get more now that it has more prominent signs at the fairgrounds.

Labor shortages plaguing small businesses across the state have also hit the fair, Yelverton said.

“We depend on our receipts to pay our bills, and just like all other small businesses, we’ve dealt with labor issues this year,” Yelverton said. “It was quite an endeavor to recruit those people and get them on board. We certainly have had folks decide that 2021 is not the year to be at the fair, and we certainly respect that, but it means we’ve got a lot of new people.”

As the fair strikes a balance between emphasizing safety and not curbing fun, the vendors on-site report the crowds trickling in at first but showing up in respectable numbers over the fair-weather weekend. Yelverton hopes for a repeat performance this weekend.

“I’m so happy to see people again,” said Debbie Anderson at Al’s French Fries. “It’s a small sense of normalcy, but I’ll take what I can get.”

This story was originally published October 20, 2021 7:00 AM.

Scores of Raleigh residents to lose homes as HOA enforces no-rentals rule

Updated October 21, 2021 6:09 p.m. EDTBy Keely Arthur, WRAL reporterRaleigh, N.C. — Some residents in a south Raleigh community are taking legal action against the neighborhood homeowners association, saying HOA board members are abusing their power by trying to force longtime renters out of the area.The covenants for Renaissance Park, off Tryon Road and South Wilmington Street, have always stated that ho...

Updated October 21, 2021 6:09 p.m. EDT

By Keely Arthur, WRAL reporter

Raleigh, N.C. — Some residents in a south Raleigh community are taking legal action against the neighborhood homeowners association, saying HOA board members are abusing their power by trying to force longtime renters out of the area.

The covenants for Renaissance Park, off Tryon Road and South Wilmington Street, have always stated that homeowners couldn't rent out their properties, except in a few specific situations. But residents say the rule was never enforced until an HOA board took over this year from Wakefield Development, which built the community in 2006.

"[T]he intent of the [covenants] for Renaissance from its inception has been for dwellings to be owner-occupied," the board wrote in a June 3 letter to residents.

The board has given homeowners until next July to end existing leases and either move back in or sell the property. Violators could face fines of $100 a day.

"I honestly can’t tell what the motivations are," resident Ankur Gupta said Thursday.

With a growing family, including a baby due in January, Gupta said he wanted to buy a second home in Renaissance Park and possibly rent out his current one.

"We wanted to keep our options open." he said. "I wanted it to be my choice, rather than a choice taken away from me.

"I paid for the house. I’m living in it – I’ve lived in it for a while – [so] it should be mine," he added.

Gupta said residents have reached out to board members dozens of times to discuss the matter with no luck, so they are working with a lawyer to get members removed.

The HOA board responded to WRAL News' requests for comments by issuing a statement through the neighborhood's property management company.

"The goal of this board is to enforce the covenants of the community in a fair and equitable manner for all members and to create reasonable expectation with a focus on long-term property value," the statement said. "We are not at liberty to choose which parts of the covenant we care to enforce and which we don’t. It is our obligation to enforce all of them."

Residents could choose to change the restriction against rental properties according to the HOA's bylaws, the statement noted.

"As written, the covenant addressing rental properties was not created to completely prohibit all rental situations. It was written with the intent of limiting rental situations within the criteria as stated in the covenant," the statement said, noting one "urgent request" for a continued lease has already been approved.

Still, some 180 renters and their families say they have less than nine months to move from Renaissance Park, and some say they don't know where to go.

"I personally could not afford to buy a home at the inflated rates that are going on right now," Kayla Schoentube said.

Schoentube moved to the neighborhood after adopting her younger brother, saying she hoped it would be a stable home for him.

"It's great for kids, so when taking on my brother, I was, like, he can ride his bike here," she said. "This might be a little devastating."

This North Carolina city was named one of the nation’s best places for families

North Carolina is home to one of the nation’s best places for families, a new report finds.The Raleigh metropolitan area ranks No. 4 on a list of regions with incomes, commute times and other factors that make them attractive for parents with children, according to results published last week from LendingTree.To come up with the list, the online marketplace said it studied the 50 biggest U.S. metros...

North Carolina is home to one of the nation’s best places for families, a new report finds.

The Raleigh metropolitan area ranks No. 4 on a list of regions with incomes, commute times and other factors that make them attractive for parents with children, according to results published last week from LendingTree.

To come up with the list, the online marketplace said it studied the 50 biggest U.S. metros using the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey. With data from 2019, the most recent year available, each place was evaluated in seven categories: family income, housing costs, home ownership, average round-trip commutes, high school enrollment among teens, unemployment and percentage of homes with children.

Raleigh was near the top of the rankings after reporting one of the country’s lowest jobless rates for people 25 to 44 years old. The unemployment rate for that age group stood at 3.1% in 2019, before the coronavirus pandemic upended the economy.

The Raleigh metro also received a nod for having kids in 35.1% of households, which was higher than most other cities in the rankings.

“Typically, more children living in an area means more schools and day care centers for families,” LendingTree said in its report. “Further, families might have an easier time fitting into a community if they aren’t the only ones with children.”

But Raleigh scored lower in other categories, landing the 12th spot for median income and the 13th spot for the percentage of families who have children and own their homes. It also ranked just about average in the remaining categories, results show.

It’s not the first time the Raleigh area has been recognized as a top place to live.

Last year, the city was named among the best in the nation for retirees and new graduates to settle down, McClatchy News reported.

On the more recent list, Charlotte was the only other North Carolina-based metro and ranked No. 12. LendingTree, which created the rankings, has a major presence in the Charlotte area.

Overall, the Salt Lake City metro was named the most family-friendly in the nation. Rounding out the top five were the Minneapolis, Kansas City and Cincinnati areas, results show.

The lowest-ranking places were Miami, New Orleans and Tampa.

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